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I need to sum variables in two data sets and join them. I would like to do this in one SQL statement, however it is a one-to-many join. I am interested to learn if a summary variable can be created, for lack of a better description, using a SELECT statement.

The below code incorrectly calculates the summary variable for HOURS since there is only 1 record per name/date in INTERVAL, but multiple records per name/date in DETAIL.

I certainly could write multiple steps to accomplish this, but wanted to see if it can be accomplished in one SQL step. Thanks

Sample Code:

data Detail;
 Length Name CallType $25;
 input date mmddyy10. name $ calltype $ count;
 Format date mmddyy10.;
 datalines;
05/01/2014 John Order 5
05/01/2014 John Complaint 6
05/01/2014 Mary Order 7
05/01/2014 Mary Complaint 8
05/01/2014 Joe Order 4
05/01/2014 Joe Complaint 2
05/01/2014 Joe Internal 2
05/02/2014 John Order 6
05/02/2014 John Complaint 4
05/02/2014 Mary Order 9
05/02/2014 Mary Complaint 7
05/02/2014 Joe Order 3
05/02/2014 Joe Complaint 1
05/02/2014 Joe Internal 3
;

data Interval;
 Length Name $25;
 input date mmddyy10. name $ hours;
 Format date mmddyy10.;
 datalines;
05/01/2014 John 8
05/01/2014 Mary 6
05/01/2014 Joe 4
05/02/2014 John 8
05/02/2014 Mary 6
05/02/2014 Joe 4
;

PROC SQL noprint feedback;
 CREATE TABLE SUMMARY AS
 SELECT
  D.Name
  , Sum(D.Count) as Count
  , Sum(I.Hours) as Hours
 FROM Detail D, Interval I
 WHERE D.Name=I.Name and D.Date=I.Date
 GROUP BY D.Name
 ORDER BY D.Name;
QUIT;
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

This works and shouldn't be too inefficient. Personally I think the best way would be to summarize both independently prior to merging:

PROC SQL noprint feedback;
 CREATE TABLE SUMMARY AS
 SELECT
  D.Name
  , Sum(D.Count) as Count
  , (SELECT sum(I.Hours) as Hours from Interval I WHERE D.Name=I.Name GROUP BY i.name) as Hours
 FROM Detail D
 GROUP BY D.Name
 ORDER BY D.Name
 ;
QUIT;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. because it's easier to debug? the code is cleaner? or you think it is more efficient? –  CarolinaJay65 Jun 10 at 16:28
    
So in your outer FROM statement, you do not do a join? –  CarolinaJay65 Jun 10 at 16:35
    
Is that just a typo in the GROUP BY statement? –  CarolinaJay65 Jun 10 at 16:35
    
All three =) I found the solution I provided to be a little non-intuitive when I was working on it as I first tried putting the sum outside the select, and once I had moved it inside I was still missing the internal group by. So I think doing it in separate steps would be more intuitive, easier to debug (as you can see intermediate results) and more efficient as the joins only take place after the data has been summarized. –  Robert Penridge Jun 10 at 16:38
1  
Yes that was a typo - I removed it thanks. I'm kind of surprised SAS didn't kick up a stink about it. And yes, no need for a join on the outer FROM statement. –  Robert Penridge Jun 10 at 16:39

Robert's solutions works fine, but I get better perfomance when moving subqueries to the from clause instead of using them in the select. When used in the from both queries are executed just once and the results are joined, while a subquery in the select will exectute once for each row.

    proc sql;
     create table summary as
     select
      d.name,
      count,
      hours
     from
      (select name, sum(count) as count from detail group by name) d inner join 
      (select name, sum(hours) as hours from interval group by name) i
      on d.name = i.name
     order by d.name
    ;
    quit;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I actually like your solution better Laurent... Easier to read and performs better. –  Robert Penridge Jul 17 at 21:59

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