Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a small program, that creates files at an interval of 1 minute. But the time at which the file is created and last written and the last modification time of the file as shown by ls command differs by 1 second. The code and the output is presented below. please let me know where could be the bug?

root@new:/home/srinivas# cat b.c
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
int main ()
{
    int fd;
    int i=0;
    time_t initial_time = time(NULL);
    time_t interval = 60;
    time_t curr_time = time(NULL);

    fd=open ("test1.txt", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, 0666);
    write(fd,"abcd1",5);
    while(1)
    {
        curr_time = time(NULL);
        if(curr_time >= initial_time)
        {
            if(i==0)
            {
                close(fd);
                printf("\ntime before test2.txt fileopen= %d\n", time(NULL));
                fd=open ("test2.txt", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, 0666);
                write(fd,"abcd2",5);
                printf("time after test2.txt filewrite= %d\n", time(NULL));
                system("ls -l --time-style=+%s test2.txt");
                initial_time += interval;
                i=1;
            }
            else
            {
                close(fd);
                printf("\ntime before test1.txt fileopen= %d\n", time(NULL));
                fd=open ("test1.txt", O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, 0666);
                write(fd,"abcd1",5);
                printf("time after test1.txt filewrite= %d\n", time(NULL));
                system("ls -l --time-style=+%s test1.txt");
                initial_time += interval;
                i=0;
            }
        }
        usleep(1000);
    }
    return 0;
}
root@new:/home/srinivas# gcc b.c
root@new:/home/srinivas# ./a.out

time before test2.txt fileopen= 1268203133
time after test2.txt filewrite= 1268203133
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 5 1268203133 test2.txt

time before test1.txt fileopen= 1268203193
time after test1.txt filewrite= 1268203193
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 5 1268203192 test1.txt

time before test2.txt fileopen= 1268203253
time after test2.txt filewrite= 1268203253
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 5 1268203252 test2.txt

time before test1.txt fileopen= 1268203313
time after test1.txt filewrite= 1268203313
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 5 1268203312 test1.txt

time before test2.txt fileopen= 1268203373
time after test2.txt filewrite= 1268203373
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 5 1268203372 test2.txt

root@new:/home/srinivas# ls -ltr --time-style=+%s
total 40
-rwxrwxrwx  1 root     root      1095 1268202457 b.c
-rwxr-xr-x  1 root     root     10300 1268202459 a.out
-rw-r--r--  1 root     root         5 1268203312 test1.txt
-rw-r--r--  1 root     root         5 1268203372 test2.txt
root@new:/home/srinivas#

Thanks and regards,

Srinivas

share|improve this question
    
It works fine here, but what you're seeing is really unexpected... is your home dir perhaps using some "weird" filesystem like NFS, or any special mount options? –  Martin Mar 10 '10 at 7:07
    
@Martin - I'm able to reproduce this on a locally mounted filesystem. It's very odd... –  R Samuel Klatchko Mar 10 '10 at 7:23
    
@Martin - My /home is ext3 formatted. Not a mounted partition. –  Srinivas Nayak Mar 10 '10 at 7:26

3 Answers 3

First, there is a problem in your code.

  • Remove the open() and write() before the loop, they aren't doing anything.
  • Move the two close() call just after the write() calls.

This will ensure that the data is written and the file closed before you look its modification time using ls. Otherwise, there's a 1 second delay between the write() and the close(). Since you are writing only 5 bytes, it will get buffered. So, when you're checking the time after the write() call, you have no guarantee that the data have been written yet, so the file may not have been modified, which may screw your results.

Second, you cannot assume a 1 second delay because time() and ls report a 1 second difference. Since a second is your smallest unit, you should expect rounding difference. And since you are using two different methods to get the number of seconds since Epoch, they may use different rounding rules, which will easily result in a 1 second difference. If we add to that the filesystem which store the modification time, you actually have three different actors which may influence your results.

Also, if you look correctly at your result, you will see that its time() which indicate one second later than ls. So, you don't have a delay at all, you are going back in time! The rounding difference is the most probable reason for this.

So, there are no bug in Linux time() function or Linux OS calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually this is exactly the replica of my original needed program/functionality. So though moving open(), write() functions will hide the problem, I was looking for the answer to problem that is revealed because of my original code. –  Srinivas Nayak Mar 11 '10 at 6:08
    
@Srinivas I'm not sure of what your are saying... I don't want you to move open() and write(), I want you to remove them. This will allow to have the close() call after your write() calls, so there's no delay between them. Otherwise, there's a 1 second delay between the write() and the close(). Since you are writing only 5 bytes, it will get buffered. So, when you're checking the time after the write() call, you have no guarantee that the data have been written, so the file may not have been modified, which may screw your results. –  Laurent Parenteau Mar 11 '10 at 13:05
  • writing in a file takes some time.
  • call to the time() function takes some time
  • the execution of the logic of the time() function takes some time.

all this results in the 1 sec delay ..Its not at all a bug!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.