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Let's say you have some code like this:

void myFunction()
{
    myClass * mine = new myClass();
    // body of function
    delete mine;
}

If an exception is thrown within the body of the function, the delete will never be called and a memory leak will result. What is the best way to alleviate this, other than using any of the managed pointers within <memory>.

share|improve this question
4  
Write your own managed pointer class? (Note: don't. Use an existing implementation.) – Oliver Charlesworth Jun 10 '14 at 20:43
    
Create your own class that manages the pointer. – PaulMcKenzie Jun 10 '14 at 20:44
3  
What is your aversion to using a tried and tested managed pointer? – Matt Coubrough Jun 10 '14 at 20:45
1  
std::auto_ptr or std::unique_ptr (C++11) is the way to go. – Marius Jun 10 '14 at 20:46
    
Thats why you should deallocate memory in the destructor – user2365568 Jun 10 '14 at 20:48
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The way to manage it without smart pointer is available, though not recommended:

void myFunction()
{
    myClass * mine = 0;
    try {
        mine = new myClass();
        // body of function
    }
    catch(...) {
        delete mine;
        throw;
    }
    delete mine;
}

Again this method is more error prone (code duplicate etc), RAII is preferred as answered before .

share|improve this answer

Use RAII. There are many ways to do this, the best would be to use tried and tested solutions such as smart pointers like std::unique_ptr<myClass> or boost::scoped_ptr<myClass>.

If you want to go through the exercise of implementing a RAII solution yourself, it could be in the form of a scope guard:

struct guard
{
  myClass* ptr;
  guard(myClass* p) : ptr(p) {}
  ~guard() { delete ptr; }
  guard(const guard&) = delete;
  guard& operator=(const guard&) = delete;
};

Note that RAII requires that the code be in a try block at some level.

share|improve this answer
    
Is using smart pointers the only solution to this? There is no way using raw pointers? – 1110101001 Jun 10 '14 at 20:53
    
@user2612743 I just gave you another solution. A scope guard. – juanchopanza Jun 10 '14 at 20:58

Memory Leaks of such kind can easily be avoided by using std::auto_ptr or (with C++11) std::unique_ptr:

#include <memory>

void myFunction()
{
    std::unique_ptr<myClass> mine(new myClass());
    // Use mine as before, mine->foo() or *mine is totally valid
    // The instance of myClass is deleted as soon as the unique_ptr goes out of scope
    // body of function
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I know that, but is there anyway to do it without using managed pointers? – 1110101001 Jun 10 '14 at 20:52
1  
Define your own class like juanchopanza said. But that is error prone, and it would basically be a case of 'reinventing the wheel'. std::unique_ptr is a very lightweight encapsulation. When you speak about managed pointers you almost always mean std::shared_ptr which introduces the overhead of reference counting etc. – Marius Jun 10 '14 at 20:54
    
is there anyway to do it without using managed pointers Even with home-made code, you're "managing the pointer". – PaulMcKenzie Jun 10 '14 at 20:57

Your first preference should be not to use new at all. There's nothing in your stripped down example that suggests stack allocation would fail:

void myFunction()
{
    myClass mine;
    // body of function
}

If you do need to allocate on the heap, then prefer to use RAII wrappers (preferring ones in the standard library over custom ones), or try/catch structures.

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