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I have JSON output correctly annotated and mapped with mixins for the User class with appropriate setters and getters for those properties:

 public class User {
      String first;
      String middle;
      String last;

      ...
 }

When I use my Mixin:

 public interface UserMixin {
     @JsonProperty("first")
     void setFirst(String first);

     @JsonProperty("middle")
     void setMiddle(String middle);

     @JsonProperty("last")
     void setLast(String last);
 }

After registering the mixin and writing the User class using the ObjectMapper I get:

 "User" :
 {
     "first"  : "William",
     "middle" : "S",
     "last"   : "Preston"
 }

So to this point, for brevity, I lied a little bit - User as cited above is a large, legacy DTO class that is resistant towards modification.

And, while the mixin works great, our customer would rather see something like:

 "User" :
 {
     "Name" : 
     {
         "first"  : "William",
         "middle" : "S",
         "last"   : "Preston"
     }

     ...
 }

I repeat, the DTO is resistant to change. Ideally I'd refactor the DTO and do it correctly.

What I think I'm asking - is there some combination of Mixin/Annotation I can use to sub-class "Name" from already existing data in the User class? There's no Name subclass ... but all of the pieces necessary to "write out" the JSON in this format exist.

share|improve this question
    
I think the best you can do is create your own JsonSerializer. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 10 at 20:57
    
Going the opposite way is trivial - @JsonUnwrapped. Unfortunately to my knowledge automatically wrapping the value is not supported. –  Mark Peters Jun 10 at 21:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lacking the existence of a @JsonWrapped annotation, my personal preferred solution here would be to use the converter functionality of @JsonSerialize (looks like you'd need Jackson 2.3+ for this; the annotation is supported in 2.2.2 but I got unexpected runtime errors).

Basically, a converter lets you do a pre-serialization transformation from one data structure to another. This lets you work with simple data classes rather than mucking about creating a custom serializer.

First, model your DTO how you want it to be serialized:

public static class UserDto {
    private final Name name;

    private UserDto(Name name) { this.name = name; }

    public static UserDto fromUser(User user) {
        return new UserDto(Name.fromUser(user));
    }

    public Name getName() { return name; }

    public static class Name {
        private final String first;
        private final String middle;
        private final String last;

        private Name(String first, String middle, String last) {
            this.first = first;
            this.middle = middle;
            this.last = last;
        }

        public static Name fromUser(User user) {
            return new Name(user.getFirst(), user.getMiddle(), user.getLast());
        }

        public String getFirst() { return first; }
        public String getMiddle() { return middle; }
        public String getLast() { return last; }
    }
}

Next, create a simple Converter class (I nested it in UserDto):

    public static class Converter extends StdConverter<User, UserDto> {
        @Override
        public UserDto convert(User value) {
            return UserDto.fromUser(value);

        }
    }

Then, use that converter class in your mixin:

@JsonSerialize(converter = UserDto.Converter.class)
public interface UserMixin {
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works: creating an interim POJO between the legacy User DTO allows us to convert to the format we need, and also streamline out some of the legacy cruft that we don't. Thanks! –  hrrf Jun 11 at 14:50

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