Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does the return false stop the alert() from working and how do I get around this? If I remove it, the alert will show up, and then it will load the page that the <a> tag pointed to.

<script type="text/javascript">
    $("document").ready(function(){
        $("a").click(function(){
            if(!$(this).is('static')){
                var href = $(this).attr('href');
                $.getJSON(href, function(data) {
                    alert('hi');
                });
            }
            return false;
        });
    });
</script>
share|improve this question
    
Please add newlines in your code when posting. Otherwise its next to impossible to read your code... Look into the <pre> button –  Warty Mar 10 '10 at 7:46
    
Yah sure, I'll remember to do that next time. –  Dylan Mar 10 '10 at 7:47
    
@Dylan: Can it be, that the .is('static') is erroneous? The is() would test the link for having an element name 'static', which is obviously always wrong. The correct way would be .hasClass('static') or .is('.static'), wouldn't it? –  Boldewyn Mar 10 '10 at 7:55
    
@Boldewyn That was just a typo. I tried taking it out altogether and nothing changed. –  Dylan Mar 10 '10 at 7:58
    
@Dylan: Then, have you tested the posted code snippet alone with a minimal markup setup? I can't find any reason, why it shouldn't work as expected. –  Boldewyn Mar 10 '10 at 8:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My guess is that badly formed JSON is being sent to the client, which will prevent the callback from firing. The manual says:

If there is a syntax error in the JSON file, the request will usually fail silently. Avoid frequent hand-editing of JSON data for this reason.

Can you show us a snapshot of the JSON that the server is generating?

share|improve this answer
2  
That was in fact it. Sorry for not thinking of that guys, and thanks a ton! –  Dylan Mar 10 '10 at 8:26

Answer Update!

I have tested this thoroughly using the $.ajax functions, which is what actually gets called by $.getJSON.

$("document").ready(function(){
    $("a").click(function(event){
        if(!$(this).is('static')){
            var href = $(this).attr('href');
            $.ajax({
              url: href,
              dataType: 'text',
              success: function(data) {
                  alert("hi");
              }
            });

        }
        return false;
    });
});

With a correctly formatted JSON object, this works as expected. Here is the contents of my json.html test file:

{ "firstName" : "John",
                "lastName"  : "Doe",
                "age"       : 23 }

However, if the file contains HTML, or a badly formatted JSON object, the alert never gets called - in fact, by adding an error handler to the above example, you'll spot that it errors:

$("document").ready(function(){
    $("a").click(function(event){
        if(!$(this).is('static')){
            var href = $(this).attr('href');
            $.ajax({
              url: href,
              dataType: 'text',
              success: function(data) {
                  alert("hi");
              },
              error: function() {
                alert("NO!!!!");
              }
            });

        }
        return false;
    });
});

As you are replacing hyperlinks in your code with this request, I'm guessing that you maybe want to use a $.get, rather than a $.getJSON. So to return to your original example:

<script type="text/javascript">
    $("document").ready(function(){
        $("a").click(function(){
            if(!$(this).is('static')){
                var href = $(this).attr('href');
                $.get(href, function(data) {
                    alert('hi');
                });
            }
            return false;
        });
    });
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
So how can I get around this? –  Dylan Mar 10 '10 at 7:51
    
Alert in the callback function –  Dustin Laine Mar 10 '10 at 7:53
4  
@Sohnee: What's your point? When the alert() is called, after the leaving of the page is cancelled (remember: that's what the return false; is for), it should still show up. That's the whole point of asynchronous JS. –  Boldewyn Mar 10 '10 at 7:53
    
Yep - see my revision. I'm looking at why it behaves differently between getJSON and get (which both call the underlying ajax function). –  Steve Fenton Mar 10 '10 at 8:01
    
@Sohnee I tried it with just a plain $.get and your right, it did work. So whats the difference? –  Dylan Mar 10 '10 at 8:03

This seems to work in Firefox 3 and in Chrome, with both get and getJSON.

IE8 is another story (I presume the same goes for IE7). There, only get works; getJSON fails. Is the JSON being returned by the server not IE-friendly?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.