Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a menu using angular. A menu item can have children requiring another ng-repeat to print the sub nav items. I'm noticing some strange behavior when attempting to insert an anchor tag within the 2nd ng-repeat.

Link to fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/npU7t/

<li ng-repeat="sub_menu_item in menu_item.sub_menu">
    <a href="">
        {{ sub_menu_item.title }}
    </a>
</li>

With

{
    title: 'menu item with children',
    sub_menu: [
        {
            title: '<-- empty anchor tag???'
        }
    ]
}

Results in

<li ng-repeat="sub_menu_item in menu_item.sub_menu" class="ng-scope">
    <a href=""></a>
    <a href="" class="ng-binding"><-- empty anchor tag???</a>
</li>

Where the did duplicate / empty anchor tag come from? How can I prevent it from being created?

Appreciate the help!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This isn't a bug with Angular, but rather how you have your markup.

UPDATE:

The issue is actually the nested <a> tag, not the <ul> tag.

<a href="">
     <span class="title">{{ menu_item.title }}</span>
     <ul class="sub-menu" ng-if="menu_item.sub_menu">
         <li ng-repeat="sub_menu_item in menu_item.sub_menu">
             <a href="">
                 {{ sub_menu_item.title }}
             </a>
         </li>
     </ul>
</a>

In fact, if you remove Angular from the equation altogether, you will see that the extraneous <a> tag is still added to the DOM: http://jsfiddle.net/jwcarroll/cXkj4/

If you get rid of the nested <a> tag, then the extra element will disappear.

<a href="">
   <span class="title">{{ menu_item.title }}</span>
</a>
<ul class="sub-menu" ng-if="menu_item.sub_menu">
   <li ng-repeat="sub_menu_item in menu_item.sub_menu">
       <a href="">
           {{ sub_menu_item.title }}
       </a>
   </li>
</ul>

In both HTML 4.01, and HTML 5, having a nested <a> tag is a no no.

The simplest possible recreation of the problem I could come up with is this bit of markup:

<a href="">Outer
    <p>Blah
        <a href="">Inner</a>
    </p>
</a>

Because you can't nest <a> elements within each other, the browser is doing it's best to recreate your intent while keeping the DOM clean. What you end up with is this:

<a href="">Outer</a>
<p>
   <a href="">Blah</a>
   <a href="">Inner</a>
</p>

This makes sense when you realize what the browser is trying to do. The browser is trying to do three things:

  1. Keep Outer, Blah and Inner text elements inside hyperlinks
  2. Contain Blah and <a>Inner</a> inside a single <p> tag
  3. Ensure no <a> tags are nested within each other

The only sensible way to accomplish all three of these is to wrap both Outer and Blah text elements in separate <a> tags in a way that isn't nested. This is the closest approximation to the original intent without breaking the DOCTYPE rules.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Very strange. It doesn't appear with any tag besides <a> (like <p> or <div>). It looks like an outright bug to me - I'd submit a proper bug report.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried several other tags, seems like the anchor tag is the only one. –  Pim Jun 11 '14 at 3:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.