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I need to process data in another thread. It can be done in two ways:

  1. Using a thread loop waiting for an event:

    AutoResetEvent e = new AutoResetEvent(false)
    Thread t = new Thread(delegate
    {
      while(true)
      {
        e.WaitOne();
        // process data
      }
    };)
    
    void OnProgramStarted() // one time
    {
      t.Start();
    }
    
    void OnDataReceived()
    {
      // put data to queue
      e.Set();
    }
    
  2. Using the thread pool:

    void ProcessData(object state)
    {
      // process data
    }
    
    void OnDataReceived()
    {
      // put data to queue
      ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(ProcessData);
    }
    

What way will be faster?
The real tests give ambiguous results.

My benchmarking code:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;

namespace t_event_tpool
{
  class Program
  {
    const int t = 1000000;

    static Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
    static int q1, q2;


    static AutoResetEvent e1 = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    static AutoResetEvent done1 = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    static Thread thread = new Thread(ThreadProc);
    static void ThreadProc(object state)
    {
      while(true)
      {
        e1.WaitOne();
        q1++;
        done1.Set();
      }
    }


    static AutoResetEvent done2 = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    static void PoolProc(object state)
    {
      q2++;
      done2.Set();
    }


    static void TestA()
    {
      sw.Restart();
      for(int i = 0; i < t; i++)
      {
        e1.Set();
        done1.WaitOne();
      }
      sw.Stop();
      Console.WriteLine("a " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds + "\t" + q1);
    }

    static void TestB()
    {
      sw.Restart();
      for(int i = 0; i < t; i++)
      {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(PoolProc, i);
        done2.WaitOne();
      }
      sw.Stop();
      Console.WriteLine("b " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds + "\t" + q2);
    }



    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      thread.IsBackground = true;
      thread.Start();

      TestA();
      TestB();

      TestA();
      TestB();

      TestA();
      TestB();
    }
  }
}

On low CPU load (without other applications) TestB is 2 times faster than TestA. On high CPU load by other processes TestA faster than TestB.

share|improve this question
    
Most likely the thread pool approach because thread pools are meant to speed up the initialization time for threads. –  Enigmativity Jun 11 at 6:46
1  
I have fixed code. Of course, thread is initialized only one time on program start. –  Tantraus Jun 11 at 6:54
    
It looks that BlockingCollection<T> is the option: one thread (a main one?) add data to it, and the other takes and proceeds the data. –  Dmitry Bychenko Jun 11 at 6:59
    
QUWI is pretty fast but can't be as fast as a thread that can instantly continue running. If you get "ambiguous results" then just don't bother and favor QUWI. –  Hans Passant Jun 11 at 11:54
    
I think the thread should be faster too. But the test shows that on low CPU load (without other applications) QUWI faster in 1.5-2 times. If CPU load is high (by other applications), the test results are the opposite. I don't understand why this happens. Maybe my test is incorrect. –  Tantraus Jun 11 at 12:15

1 Answer 1

You are testing the overhead of starting work. This is meaningless for the speed of the actual work. Rather than optimizing overhead, make your work-items more granular so that overhead does not matter. If your work-items run faster than 0.1ms I'd seriously consider making them bigger. In your test, your work-items take just a few instructions.

To answer the question: Your custom thread that is ready to run at the signal of an event has less overhead than posting a work item to the thread-pool. You are doing almost nothing. Hard to improve on that. You'd need to use high-speed queueing patterns like the Disruptor pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to minimize overhead costs, the question is about this. –  Tantraus Jun 11 at 13:53
    
In that case see if there is an implementation of the Disruptor pattern for .NET. Note, that under load with many work items the thread pool might well have less overhead because it just has to pull from its work queue and not use OS-level synchronization. It becomes more efficient under load. So perform a realistic benchmark. I don't believe you want to use threads to increment integers. –  usr Jun 11 at 13:55
    
Increment is as close as possible to reality :) I need to minimize a delay between event and thread reaction. Events isn't often. –  Tantraus Jun 11 at 14:10
    
Then you will get nothing out of using multi-threading. Communication costs are at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than an integer increment. –  usr Jun 11 at 14:11
    
Increment in this test is only to disable possibly optimization. It doesn't affect the result. –  Tantraus Jun 11 at 14:18

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