Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I read the document I found the following notes:

When a $sort immediately precedes a $limit in the pipeline, the $sort operation only maintains the top n results as it progresses, where n is the specified limit, and MongoDB only needs to store n items in memory. This optimization still applies when allowDiskUse is true and the n items exceed the aggregation memory limit.

If I'm right about this, it applies only when I use the $sort and $limit together like

db.coll.aggregate([
    ...,
    {$sort: ...},
    {$limit: limit},
    ...
]);

However, I think most of the time we would have

db.coll.aggregate([
    ...,
    {$sort: ...},
    {$skip: skip},
    {$limit: limit},
    ...
]);

Question 1: Does it mean the rule above doesn't apply if I use $skip here?

I ask this question because theoretically MongoDB can still calculate the top n records and enhance performance by sorting only top n records. I didn't find any document about this though. And if the rule doesn't apply,

Question 2: Do I need to change my query to the following to enhance performance?

db.coll.aggregate([
    ...,
    {$sort: ...},
    {$limit: skip + limit},
    {$skip: skip},
    {$limit: limit},
    ...
]);

EDIT: I think explains my use case would make the question above makes more sense. I'm using the text search feature provided by MongoDB 2.6 to look for products. I'm worried if the user inputs a very common key word like "red", there will be too many results returned. Thus I'm looking for better ways to generate this result.

EDIT2: It turns out that the last code above equals to

db.coll.aggregate([
    ...,
    {$sort: ...},
    {$limit: skip + limit},
    {$skip: skip},
    ...
]);

Thus I we can always use this form to make the top n rule apply.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since this is a text search query we are talking about then the most optimal form is this:

db.collection.aggregate([
    { "$match": {
        "$text": { "$search": "cake tea" }
    }},
    { "$sort": { "score": { "$meta": "textScore" } },
    { "$limit": skip + limit },
    { "$skip": skip }
])

The rationale on the memory reserve from the top "sort" results will only work within it's own "limits" as it were and this will not be optimal for anything beyond a few reasonable "pages" of data.

Beyond what is reasonable for memory consumption, the additional stage will likely have a negative effect rather than positive.

These really are the practical limitations of the text search capabilities available to MongoDB in the current form. But for anything more detailed and requiring more performance, then just as is the case with many SQL "full text" solutions, you are better off using an external "purpose built" text search solution.

share|improve this answer
    
You say in the current form. Is there work underway to enhance MongoDB text search, do you know? There are some great comments here on using Solr in conjunction with MongoDB stackoverflow.com/questions/3215029/…, –  John Barça Jun 11 '14 at 11:19
    
@JohnBarça The answer you seek is actually more "official" and slightly loaded in nature. IMO MongoDB admittedly does not try to be an "optimal" key/value store nor does it try to implement every feature of a traditional relational system as a "database" goes. The extension of this is that a general purpose "database" generally does not "go in for" specialized areas such as "text search". But that is an opinion, and perspectives are often subject to change. By all means, use what works best. –  Neil Lunn Jun 11 '14 at 11:35
    
Interesting. I have been dabbling in Mongo and really like certain features. But I hear what you are saying. I'm a GIS guy and I like the geojson stuff that has been done and the aggregation spatial enhancements, but in terms of functionality still a long way from being able to leave Postgres/Postgis. I accept this is a very niche area, though. –  John Barça Jun 11 '14 at 12:09
    
@JohnBarça I agree with you guys. This is only a temp solution with which I can do it quick and simple. We did think of integrating a search engine. But not until the next phase because it would have brought too much extra work load now. And it has been much better than the "like" search we are using now:) –  yaoxing Jun 11 '14 at 13:34
    
I kept thinking about this and I think I understood why MongoDB only allow $limit other than $skip to apply the top n rule. Because skip+limit can always be turned to limit+skip. I edit my question. –  yaoxing Jun 12 '14 at 2:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.