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In what circumstances should I use this:

enum class MyFixedType : uint32_t // or any other fixed width integer type
{
    ID1,
    ID2,
    ID3
};

over this:

enum class MyType
{
    ID1,
    ID2,
    ID3
};

?

share|improve this question
4  
when you need an enum of certain size – BЈовић Jun 11 '14 at 15:04
2  
@jasal: example? – Nawaz Jun 11 '14 at 15:10
2  
@BenjaminLindley Even then, you'd use enum class MyFixedType : char or enum class MyFixedType : unsigned char. It's hard enough to find a context where you'd use uint32_t to begin with; I can't imagine any case where you'd use it to type an enum. – James Kanze Jun 11 '14 at 15:17
2  
I sometimes use uint16_t for flag enums that need to be stored in uint16_t fields for network transfer. I think once a coworker tried to add another flag and was told by the compiler that it wont fit. – PlasmaHH Jun 11 '14 at 15:19
3  
There is this whole world of embedded systems development. – av_lee Jun 11 '14 at 15:20
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A few scenario's out of the top of my head where it could be useful:

  1. There is limited space and you really don't need the standard int-sized enums. If you are on a system where integers are stored in 64bit format and you only have less the 255 different enum values, you might need to specify that you want/need less bits per enum-element.

  2. Efficient communication between machines. Assuming you know that on both machines the same byte order is used, but integers have a different default size, it might be more efficient to have a fixed width enum, as you can then communicate some bits, instead of a serialised message.

  3. You might have an important order in you enum and you might want that when you add two enums with an operator+ that when you add 2 elements, the resulting element is never between your 2 elements (which could happen when a part of you enum-values is negative, like it is in the standard implementation).

I'd guess most of these are only important in embedded cases. For example, when you need to implement a program for a microwave oven or even for the chip on your credit card, places where you haven't got a few GB of memory, but rather a few bytes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for this answer. It seems indeed that it may be useful in some particular cases. Very instructive, thanks! – Korchkidu Jun 12 '14 at 6:33

I think the greatest use of enums is code clarity.

Lets assume we have a custom 32-bit hardware device, which has 3 registers :

  • 8-bit register to read and write id
  • 8-bit register to read and write status
  • 32-bit register to read and write color

One implementation might be this :

#include <iostream>

struct SomeDeviceMemoryMap1
{
    unsigned int  id : 8;
    unsigned int  status : 8;
    unsigned int  reserved : 16;
    unsigned int  color : 32;
};


int main()
{
    std::cout << sizeof(SomeDeviceMemoryMap1)<<std::endl;

    SomeDeviceMemoryMap1 m1;
    m1.id = 1;
    m1.status = 5;
    m1.color = 33;
}

In c++03, if you used enum, it would be converted into an integer type.

c++11 introduced a way to set the size of an enum. The above example can be converted into this :

#include <iostream>

enum class MyFixedType1 : uint8_t
{
    ID1=0,
    ID2,
    ID3
};

enum class MyFixedType2 : uint8_t
{
    STATUS1,
    STATUS2,
    STATUS3=5
};

enum class MyFixedType3 : uint32_t
{
    RED,
    BLUE = 33,
    BLACK
};

struct SomeDeviceMemoryMap2
{
    MyFixedType1  id;
    MyFixedType2  status;
    unsigned int  reserved : 16;
    MyFixedType3  color;
};


int main()
{
    std::cout << sizeof(SomeDeviceMemoryMap2)<<std::endl;

    SomeDeviceMemoryMap2 m2;
    m2.id = MyFixedType1::ID1;
    m2.status = MyFixedType2::STATUS3;
    m2.color = MyFixedType3::BLUE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your help. "Lets assume we have a custom 32-bit hardware device, which has 3 registers [...] ": can you name such device please? – Korchkidu Jun 12 '14 at 6:29
    
@Korchkidu No, that was just an example. – BЈовић Jun 12 '14 at 6:53
    
ok, thanks. While theory is great too, I am really interested in practical examples though. Because this is code I read and I just wanted to be sure that in our case, it was useless. Most probably it is then. Thanks again! – Korchkidu Jun 12 '14 at 8:04
    
@Korchkidu You didn't say what your case really is. Maybe in your case it is useless as you say – BЈовић Jun 12 '14 at 9:48

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