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In Bash I can easily do something like

command1 && command2 || command3

which means to run command1 and if command1 succeeds to run command2 and if command1 fails to run command3.

What's the equivalent in PowerShell?

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stackoverflow.com/questions/1741490/… ? –  stej Mar 10 '10 at 12:12
    
@stej: That's only half of the answer. It's a duplicate, though. stackoverflow.com/questions/563600/… gets a little closer. –  Joey Mar 10 '10 at 12:23
    
I would swear I saw even a closer SO question :) –  stej Mar 10 '10 at 13:32
1  
Stej, you did - stackoverflow.com/questions/2251622/… –  Keith Hill Mar 10 '10 at 15:08
1  
Interesting method to write your own over on superuser. –  ruffin Nov 25 '14 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What Bash must be doing is implicitly casting the exit code of the commands to a Boolean when passed to the logical operators. PowerShell doesn't do this - but a function can be made to wrap the command and create the same behavior:

> function Get-ExitBoolean($cmd) { & $cmd | Out-Null; $? }

($? is a bool containing the success of the last exit code)

Given two batch files:

#pass.cmd
exit

and

#fail.cmd
exit /b 200

...the behavior can be tested:

> if (Get-ExitBoolean .\pass.cmd) { write pass } else { write fail }
pass
> if (Get-ExitBoolean .\fail.cmd) { write pass } else { write fail }
fail

The logical operators should be evaluated the same way as in Bash. First, set an alias:

> Set-Alias geb Get-ExitBoolean

Test:

> (geb .\pass.cmd) -and (geb .\fail.cmd)
False
> (geb .\fail.cmd) -and (geb .\pass.cmd)
False
> (geb .\pass.cmd) -and (geb .\pass.cmd)
True
> (geb .\pass.cmd) -or (geb .\fail.cmd)
True
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3  
So there is no simple built-in functionality for this? –  Andrew J. Brehm Mar 10 '10 at 15:15
2  
No, don't think so. I believe the designers did their best to avoid operator-hijacking usage like that. In fact, there's no ternary operator either. It is powerful enough, however, to provide the means to easily roll your own. blogs.msdn.com/powershell/archive/2006/12/29/… –  James Kolpack Mar 10 '10 at 15:51
    
Not sure the | Out-Null is necessarily a good idea. Maybe pipe to Write-Host so we can still see the output? –  jpmc26 Aug 21 '14 at 14:40

I do miss the CMD/Bash style operators &, &&, ||. It seems we have to be more verbose with Powershell v2 and below.

# equivalent to &
doThis.exe | Write-Output
doThat.exe | Write-Output

# equivalent to &&
doThis.exe | Write-Output
if ($?) { doThat.exe | Write-Output }

# equivalent to ||
doThis.exe | Write-Output
if (-not $?) { doThat.exe | Write-Output }

# Note: could also look at the value of $LASTEXITCODE
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