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If I have json that looks something like this: (wrote this by hand, so it may have errors)

{
    "http://devserver.somesite.com/someendpoint/1/2/3$metadata#Something.Start": [
        {
            "Title": "start",
            "Endpoint": "https://devserver.somesite.com/someendpoint/1/2/3/start"
        }
    ],
    "http://devserver.somesite.com/someendpoint/1/2/3$metadata#Something.Stop": [
        {
            "Title": "stop",
            "Endpoint": "https:// devserver.somesite.com/someendpoint/1/2/3/stop"
        }
    ]
}

Is there any easy, built in way (JSON.net) to have it understand that there’s a namespace in play here? Or is there a way to set a variable or pattern based JsonProperty via an attribute?

I can't have the URL as part of my business object, because that will change from environment to environment.

I know I can create a custom json converter, but before going down that route I’d like to see if there’s something more out of box that handles this. Another option is to get the data via xml and handle that by hand.

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I don't think that is valid JSON formatting... where do those http "namespaces" come from? – icelava Jun 12 '14 at 5:29
    
Sorry, this isn't even valid JSON. JSON doesn't recognize the namespace as an attribute. See jsonlint.com for validating the JSON first before asking your question. – Bil Jun 13 '14 at 3:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming you are taking this as a string that you have received from a web call you can do the following in JSON.NET.

var json = "your string here";
var obj = JObject.Parse(json);

foreach(var ns in obj.Properties) {
    var arr = (JArray)ns.Value;

    foreach(var obj2 in arr) {
        // do you logic here to get the properties
    }
}

Another option that James Newton-King provided you can do this, which seems a little cleaner:

var list = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, List<MyClass>>>(json);
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