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I am trying to play a .wav file with java. I need it when a button is pressed to play a short beep sound. I have google it but most of the code wasn't working. Can someone give me a simple code to play a .wav file.

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what wasn't working and why –  Bozho Mar 10 '10 at 13:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Finally I managed to do the following and it works fine

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

import javax.sound.sampled.AudioFormat;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioInputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;
import javax.sound.sampled.SourceDataLine;

public class MakeSound {

    private final int BUFFER_SIZE = 128000;
    private File soundFile;
    private AudioInputStream audioStream;
    private AudioFormat audioFormat;
    private SourceDataLine sourceLine;

    /**
     * @param filename the name of the file that is going to be played
     */
    public void playSound(String filename){

        String strFilename = filename;

        try {
            soundFile = new File(strFilename);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            System.exit(1);
        }

        try {
            audioStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(soundFile);
        } catch (Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();
            System.exit(1);
        }

        audioFormat = audioStream.getFormat();

        DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class, audioFormat);
        try {
            sourceLine = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
            sourceLine.open(audioFormat);
        } catch (LineUnavailableException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            System.exit(1);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            System.exit(1);
        }

        sourceLine.start();

        int nBytesRead = 0;
        byte[] abData = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
        while (nBytesRead != -1) {
            try {
                nBytesRead = audioStream.read(abData, 0, abData.length);
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            if (nBytesRead >= 0) {
                @SuppressWarnings("unused")
                int nBytesWritten = sourceLine.write(abData, 0, nBytesRead);
            }
        }

        sourceLine.drain();
        sourceLine.close();
    }
}
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6  
This one doesn't work for me. I recommend a very simple one : http://alvinalexander.com/java/java-audio-example-java-au-play-sound –  duleshi Aug 11 '13 at 14:00
    
Seriously if this is what's required to play a wav sound in Java then I'm going to stop using Java, fortunately I doubt this is right. –  Bjorn Tipling Apr 28 at 3:10
    
@duleshi your example worked for me and it is damn simple :) –  iltaf khalid Jun 15 at 8:00

here is the most elegant form i could come up without using sun.*:

import java.io.*;
import javax.sound.sampled.*;

try {
    File yourFile;
    AudioInputStream stream;
    AudioFormat format;
    DataLine.Info info;
    Clip clip;

    stream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(yourFile);
    format = stream.getFormat();
    info = new DataLine.Info(Clip.class, format);
    clip = (Clip) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
    clip.open(stream);
    clip.start();
}
catch (Exception e) {
    //whatevers
}
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Answer is referring to sun.audio.* -- an internal proprietary API, which may be removed in a future release. Here's an example of how to use that: javaworld.com/javaworld/javatips/jw-javatip24.html –  Wingman4l7 Jul 15 '13 at 2:07

Shortest form (without having to install random libraries) ?

public static void play(String filename)
{
    try
    {
        Clip clip = AudioSystem.getClip();
        clip.open(AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(new File(filename)));
        clip.start();
    }
    catch (Exception exc)
    {
        exc.printStackTrace(System.out);
    }
}

The only problem is there is no good way to make this method blocking to close and dispose the data after *.wav finishes. clip.drain() says it's blocking but it's not. The clip isn't running RIGHT AFTER start(). The only working but UGLY way I found is:

// ...
clip.start();
while (!clip.isRunning())
    Thread.sleep(10);
while (clip.isRunning())
    Thread.sleep(10);
clip.close();
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clip has an addLineListener so you don't need to use a while loop... –  Bjorn Tipling Apr 28 at 3:11

You can use an event listener to close the clip after it is played

import java.io.File;
import javax.sound.sampled.*;

public void play(File file) 
{
    try
    {
        final Clip clip = (Clip)AudioSystem.getLine(new Line.Info(Clip.class));

        clip.addLineListener(new LineListener()
        {
            @Override
            public void update(LineEvent event)
            {
                if (event.getType() == LineEvent.Type.STOP)
                    clip.close();
            }
        });

        clip.open(AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(file));
        clip.start();
    }
    catch (Exception exc)
    {
        exc.printStackTrace(System.out);
    }
}
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Renember that you could add after the start the sentence "clip.drain()" if you want to wait until the stream of audio is processed by the Line. –  Victor Oct 14 '13 at 22:44

The snippet here works fine, tested with windows sound:

public static void main(String[] args) {
        AePlayWave aw = new AePlayWave( "C:\\WINDOWS\\Media\\tada.wav" );
        aw.start();     
}
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If you still have issues with that try to change the sound device. See also the tool recommended here stackoverflow.com/questions/2175318/… –  stacker Mar 10 '10 at 13:32

Have a look at the open source project jlGui at http://www.javazoom.net/jlgui/jlgui.html which has a BasicPlayer that supports "MP3, OGG Vorbis, FLAC, MONKEY's AUDIO, WAV, AIFF, AU and SPEEX audio formats".

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