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How to use data annotations to do a conditional validation on model?

For example, lets say we have the following model (Person and Senior):

public class Person
{
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "*")]
    public string Name
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public bool IsSenior
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public Senior Senior
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

public class Senior
{
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "*")]//this should be conditional validation, based on the "IsSenior" value
    public string Description
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

And the following view:

<%= Html.EditorFor(m => m.Name)%>
<%= Html.ValidationMessageFor(m => m.Name)%>

<%= Html.CheckBoxFor(m => m.IsSenior)%>
<%= Html.ValidationMessageFor(m => m.IsSenior)%>

<%= Html.CheckBoxFor(m => m.Senior.Description)%>
<%= Html.ValidationMessageFor(m => m.Senior.Description)%>

I would like to be the "Senior.Description" property conditional required field based on the selection of the "IsSenior" propery (true -> required). How to implement conditional validation in ASP.NET MVC 2 with data annotations?


UPDATE

Found nice solution. Look below.

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1  
I've recently asked similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2280539/… –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 10 '10 at 13:44
    
I'm confused. A Senior object is always a senior, so why can IsSenior be false in that case. Don't you just need the 'Person.Senior' property to be null when Person.IsSenior is false. Or why not implement the IsSenior property as follows: bool IsSenior { get { return this.Senior != null; } }. –  Steven Mar 10 '10 at 13:46
    
Steven: "IsSenior" translates to the checkbox field in the view. When user checks the "IsSenior" checkBox then the "Senior.Description" Field become mandatory. –  Peter Stegnar Mar 10 '10 at 14:47
    
Darin Dimitrov: Well sort of, but not quite. You see, how would you achieve that the the error mesage is appent to the specific field? If you validate at object level, you get an error at object level. I need error on property level. –  Peter Stegnar Mar 10 '10 at 14:51

10 Answers 10

there's a much better way to add conditional validation rules in MVC3. Have your model inherit IValidatableObject and implement the Validate method:

public class Person : IValidatableObject
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool IsSenior { get; set; }
    public Senior Senior { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext) 
    { 
     if (IsSenior && string.IsNullOrEmpty(Senior.Description)) 
        yield return new ValidationResult("Description must be supplied.");
    }
}

see more of a description at http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2010/07/27/introducing-asp-net-mvc-3-preview-1.aspx

share|improve this answer
2  
+1, implementing IValidateObject is awesome! :) However, your brackets were barely off (I edited them to fix it). –  Travis J Apr 17 '12 at 22:53
    
if property is "int" type, that requires value, if fill that field, Validate does not work.. –  Jhoon Bey Dec 6 '12 at 12:45
    
Unfortunately, Microsoft put this in the wrong layer - validation is business logic and this interface is in the System.Web DLL. In order to use this, you have to give your business layer a dependency on a presentation technology. –  NightOwl888 Jul 28 '13 at 15:45
4  
you don't get any client-side validation with this.... –  drogon Sep 13 '13 at 15:46
2  
you do if you implement it - see full example at falconwebtech.com/post/… –  viperguynaz Sep 13 '13 at 15:48
up vote 32 down vote accepted

I have solved it with handling the "ModelState" dictionary which is contained by the controller. ModelState dictionary include all the members that are have to be validated.

Here is the solution:

If you need to implement a conditional validation based on some field (e.g. if A=true, then B is requited), while maintain property level error message (this is not true for the custom validators that are on object level) you can achieve this by handling "ModelState" by simply remove unwanted validations from it.

...In some class...

public bool PropertyThatRequiredAnotherFieldToBeFilled
{
  get;
  set;
}

[Required(ErrorMessage = "*")] 
public string DepentedProperty
{
  get;
  set;
}

...class continues...

...In some controller action ...

if (!PropertyThatRequiredAnotherFieldToBeFilled)
{
   this.ModelState.Remove("DepentedProperty");
}

...

By this we achieve conditional validation, while leaving everything else the same.


UPDATE:

My final implementation look like that I have implemented it with an interface on model and action attribute that validates model which implements the mentioned interface. Interface prescribes the Validate(ModelStateDictionary modelState) method. Attribute on action just call the Validate(modelState) on IValidatiorSomething.

I did not want to complicate this answer, that way I did not mention the final implementation details, with at the end in production code matters.

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10  
The downside is that one of part your validation logic is located in the model and the other part in the controller(s). –  Kristof Claes Mar 11 '10 at 12:45
    
Well of course this is not necessary. I just show the most basic example. I have implemented this with interface on model and with action attribute that validates model which implements the mentioned interface. Interface perspires the Validate(ModelStateDictionary modelState) method. So finally you DO all validation in the model. Anyway, good point. –  Peter Stegnar Mar 11 '10 at 16:49
    
I like the simplicity of this approach in the mean time until the MVC team builds something better out of the box. But does your solution work with client side validation enabled?? –  Aaron Feb 21 '11 at 1:58
2  
@Aaron: I am happy that you like solution, but unfortunately this solution does not work with client side validation (as every validation attribute need its JavaScript implementation). You could help yourself with "Remote" attribute, so just Ajax call will be emitted to validate it. –  Peter Stegnar Feb 21 '11 at 12:07
    
Are you able to expand on this answer? This makes some sense, but I want to make sure I'm crystal on it. I'm faced with this exact situation, and I want to get it resolved. –  Richard B Jun 20 '11 at 15:45

I had the same problem yesterday but I did it in a very clean way which works for both client side and server side validation.

Condition: Based on the value of other property in the model, you want to make another property required. Here is the code

public class RequiredIfAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    private String PropertyName { get; set; }
    private Object DesiredValue { get; set; }

    public RequiredIfAttribute(String propertyName, Object desiredvalue)
    {
        PropertyName = propertyName;
        DesiredValue = desiredvalue;
    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext context)
    {
        Object instance = context.ObjectInstance;
        Type type = instance.GetType();
        Object proprtyvalue = type.GetProperty(PropertyName).GetValue(instance, null);
        if (proprtyvalue.ToString() == DesiredValue.ToString())
        {
            ValidationResult result = base.IsValid(value, context);
            return result;
        }
        return ValidationResult.Success;
    }
}

Here PropertyName is the property on which you want to make your condition DesiredValue is the particular value of the PropertyName (property) for which your other property has to be validated for required

Say you have the following

public class User
{
    public UserType UserType { get; set; }

    [RequiredIf("UserType", UserType.Admin, ErrorMessageResourceName = "PasswordRequired", ErrorMessageResourceType = typeof(ResourceString))]
    public string Password
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

At last but not the least , register adapter for your attribute so that it can do client side validation (I put it in global.asax, Application_Start)

 DataAnnotationsModelValidatorProvider.RegisterAdapter(typeof(RequiredIfAttribute),typeof(RequiredAttributeAdapter));
share|improve this answer
    
This is was the original starting point miroprocessordev.blogspot.com/2012/08/… –  Dan Hunex Apr 13 '13 at 17:00
    
Is there any equvalent solution in asp.net mvc2? ValidationResult, ValidationContext classes are not available in asp.net mvc2 (.net framework 3.5) –  User_MVC Nov 8 '13 at 7:45
    
@User_MVC I didnt work on mvc2 and dont know but if there is any validation , try to extend that –  Dan Hunex Dec 4 '13 at 23:04
    
This only works server-side as the linked blog states –  Pakman Jan 29 at 19:44
    
I managed to get this working in the client side with MVC5, but in client it fires up the validation no matter what the DesiredValue is. –  Geethanga Feb 23 at 5:32

Thanks Merritt :)

I've just updated this to MVC 3 in case anyone finds it useful; http://blogs.msdn.com/b/simonince/archive/2011/02/04/conditional-validation-in-asp-net-mvc-3.aspx

Simon

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You can disable validators conditionally by removing errors from ModelState:

ModelState["DependentProperty"].Errors.Clear();
share|improve this answer

Check out this guy:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/simonince/archive/2010/06/04/conditional-validation-in-mvc.aspx

I am working through his example project right now.

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You need to validate at Person level, not on Senior level, or Senior must have a reference to its parent Person. It seems to me that you need a self validation mechanism that defines the validation on the Person and not on one of its properties. I'm not sure, but I don't think DataAnnotations supports this out of the box. What you can do create your own Attribute that derives from ValidationAttribute that can be decorated on class level and next create a custom validator that also allows those class-level validators to run.

I know Validation Application Block supports self-validation out-of the box, but VAB has a pretty steep learning curve. Nevertheless, here's an example using VAB:

[HasSelfValidation]
public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool IsSenior { get; set; }
    public Senior Senior { get; set; }

    [SelfValidation]
    public void ValidateRange(ValidationResults results)
    {
        if (this.IsSenior && this.Senior != null && 
            string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.Senior.Description))
        {
            results.AddResult(new ValidationResult(
                "A senior description is required", 
                this, "", "", null));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
"You need to validate at Person level, not on Senior level" Yes this is an option, but you loose the ability that the error is appended to particular field, that is required in the Senior object. –  Peter Stegnar Mar 11 '10 at 8:34

I had the same problem, needed a modification of [Required] attribute - make field required in dependence of http request.The solution was similar to Dan Hunex answer, but his solution didn't work correctly (see comments). I don't use unobtrusive validation, just MicrosoftMvcValidation.js out of the box. Here it is. Implement your custom attribute:

public class RequiredIfAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{

    public RequiredIfAttribute(/*You can put here pararmeters if You need, as seen in other answers of this topic*/)
    {

    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext context)
    {

    //You can put your logic here   

        return ValidationResult.Success;//I don't need its server-side so it always valid on server but you can do what you need
    }


}

Then you need to implement your custom provider to use it as an adapter in your global.asax

public class RequreIfValidator : DataAnnotationsModelValidator <RequiredIfAttribute>
{

    ControllerContext ccontext;
    public RequreIfValidator(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context, RequiredIfAttribute attribute)
       : base(metadata, context, attribute)
    {
        ccontext = context;// I need only http request
    }

//override it for custom client-side validation 
     public override IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules()
     {       
               //here you can customize it as you want
         ModelClientValidationRule rule = new ModelClientValidationRule()
         {
             ErrorMessage = ErrorMessage,
    //and here is what i need on client side - if you want to make field required on client side just make ValidationType "required"    
             ValidationType =(ccontext.HttpContext.Request["extOperation"] == "2") ? "required" : "none";
         };
         return new ModelClientValidationRule[] { rule };
      }
}

And modify your global.asax with a line

DataAnnotationsModelValidatorProvider.RegisterAdapter(typeof(RequiredIfAttribute), typeof(RequreIfValidator));

and here it is

[RequiredIf]
public string NomenclatureId { get; set; }

The main advantage for me is that I don't have to code custom client validator as in case of unobtrusive validation. it works just as [Required], but only in cases that you want.

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There is now a framework that does this conditional validation (among other handy data annotation validations) out of the box: http://foolproof.codeplex.com/

Specifically, take a look at the [RequiredIfTrue("IsSenior")] validator. You put that directly on the property you want to validate, so you get the desired behavior of the validation error being associated to the "Senior" property.

It is available as a NuGet package.

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    using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
    using System.Runtime.Serialization;



    namespace TemplateProject.Entity.DTO
      {
    [DataContract]
   public class RecoverPassword : IValidatableObject
   {

    [Required(AllowEmptyStrings = false, ErrorMessage = "Please enter type ")]
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public string Type { get; set; }
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public string PhoneNumber { get; set; }
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public Data Data { get; set; }
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public string ResponseCode { get; set; }
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public string Message { get; set; }
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public string LoginSessionKey { get; set; }
    [Required(AllowEmptyStrings = false, ErrorMessage = "Please enter Value.")]        
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public string Value { get; set; }
    [DataMember(EmitDefaultValue = false)]
    public string Email { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Value) && (string.Compare(Type, "email", true) == 0))
        {
            System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex reg = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex("\\w+([-+.]\\w+)*@\\w+([-.]\\w+)*\\.\\w+([-.]\\w+)*");
            if (!reg.IsMatch(Value))
            {
                yield return new ValidationResult("Invalid email.");
            }

        }

        else if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Value) && (string.Compare(Type, "phonenumber", true) == 0))
        {
            System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex reg = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex("^[+]?([\\d]{3}(-| )?[\\d]{3}(-| )?[\\d]{4}|[\\d]{5,12}|}|[(][\\d]{3}[)](-| )?[\\d]{3}(-| )?[\\d]{4})$");
            if (!reg.IsMatch(Value))
            {
                yield return new ValidationResult("Invalid phonenumber.");
            }

        }

    }

}

}

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The above code is working very well for my web api. –  Preetika Jul 28 at 8:57
    
I am glad it is working for you but you need to explain your answer. –  staticx Jul 28 at 9:43

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