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So, it appears that the src attribute is sacred in Nokogiri (or libxml2?):

> Nokogiri::HTML.fragment('<foo src="{{bar}}"></foo>').to_html
=> "<foo src=\"%7B%7Bbar%7D%7D\"></foo>"

Is there any way to avoid URL encoding this attribute (at least for custom elements)? to_xml isn't an option (I can't guarantee a XHTML-safe environment).

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I think you may be out of luck, it appears libxml special cases a selection of attributes and always URI escapes them and there isn’t any way to override that as far as I can see (short of building a custom versions of libxml). –  matt Jun 13 at 22:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you're expecting Nokogiri to do things it shouldn't.

<foo src="{{bar}}"></foo>

is not HTML, as <foo> is not a known HTML tag. On the other hand, it could be a valid XML tag.

Looking at what Nokogiri does with your fragment, here's what happens with it as HTML:

require 'nokogiri'
doc = Nokogiri::HTML.fragment('<a src="{{bar}}"></a>')
# => #(DocumentFragment:0x3fe6d6897ba8 {
#      name = "#document-fragment",
#      children = [
#        #(Element:0x3fe6d6897900 {
#          name = "a",
#          attributes = [
#            #(Attr:0x3fe6d68978d8 { name = "src", value = "{{bar}}" })]
#          })]
#      })
doc.to_s
# => "<a src=\"%7B%7Bbar%7D%7D\"></a>"

And what happens if it's treated correctly as XML:

doc = Nokogiri::XML.fragment('<a src="{{bar}}"></a>')
# => #(DocumentFragment:0x3fe6d68930d0 {
#      name = "#document-fragment",
#      children = [
#        #(Element:0x3fe6d6892eb4 {
#          name = "a",
#          attributes = [
#            #(Attr:0x3fe6d6892e8c { name = "src", value = "{{bar}}" })]
#          })]
#      })
doc.to_s
# => "<a src=\"{{bar}}\"/>"
doc.to_xml
# => "<a src=\"{{bar}}\"/>"
doc.to_html
# => "<a src=\"%7B%7Bbar%7D%7D\"></a>"

Nokogiri has a set of rules it uses when parsing HTML, but it basically turns a HTML DOM into an XML DOM internally, which is visible when you look at the inspection of the document after parsing it as HTML. It's during the output of the document that the conversion happens. You might be able to nudge Nokogiri using the parsing options and get it to output what you want.

If you feel this is improper behavior for Nokogiri, I'd highly recommend taking it up with the maintainers in a bug report. They occasionally drop by here to answer questions, but you'll get faster responses on the Nokogiri talk mail list, or on the git hub page.

If you have markup that isn't valid HTML then Nokogiri will try to coerce into some sort of semblance of valid HTML. At that point you should be able to get reasonable XML, XHTML or HTML from it, where "reasonable" means it'll be semantically valid, just maybe not exactly what you hoped for.

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