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In my client:

 numbytes = send(sockfd, argv[2], strlen(argv[2]), 0)

In my server:

 numbytes = recv(new_fd, buf, MAXBUFLEN-1 , 0)

In both cases numbytes is 0, argv[2]="test" and MAXBUFLEN=100. I don't know why 0 bytes are being sent/received. I'm sending the data via cygwin to a vm.

Edit: I've tested the code with a separate client thats worked before and I get the same problem, so I assume the problem is with the server

Client:

$ ./talker.exe 155.26.37.55 test
argv[2]: test
talker: sent 0 bytes to 155.26.37.55

Server:

Maxbuflen: 100
listener: got packet from 155.26.37.55
listener: packet is 0 bytes long
listener: packet contains ""

Code Cient:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

#define SERVERPORT "4951"    // the port users will be connecting to

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int sockfd;
    struct addrinfo hints, *servinfo, *p;
    int rv;
    int numbytes;

    if (argc != 3) {
        fprintf(stderr,"usage: talker hostname message\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    memset(&hints, 0, sizeof hints);
    hints.ai_family = AF_UNSPEC;
    hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;

    if ((rv = getaddrinfo(argv[1], SERVERPORT, &hints, &servinfo)) != 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "getaddrinfo: %s\n", gai_strerror(rv));
        return 1;
    }

    // loop through all the results and make a socket
    for(p = servinfo; p != NULL; p = p->ai_next) {
        if ((sockfd = socket(p->ai_family, p->ai_socktype,
                p->ai_protocol)) == -1) {
            perror("talker: socket");
            continue;
        }
        if (connect(sockfd, p->ai_addr, p->ai_addrlen) == -1) {
              close(sockfd);
              perror("client: connect");
              continue;
          }

        break;
    }

    if (p == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "talker: failed to bind socket\n");
        return 2;
    }
    std::cout<<"argv[2] "<<argv[2]<<std::endl;
    if ((numbytes = send(sockfd, argv[2], strlen(argv[2]), 0) == -1)) {
        perror("talker: send");
        exit(1);
    }

    freeaddrinfo(servinfo);

    printf("talker: sent %d bytes to %s\n", numbytes, argv[1]);
    close(sockfd);

    return 0;
}

Code server:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

#define MYPORT "4951"    // the port users will be connecting to

#define MAXBUFLEN 100
#define BACKLOG 10

// get sockaddr, IPv4 or IPv6:
void *get_in_addr(struct sockaddr *sa)
{
    if (sa->sa_family == AF_INET) {
        return &(((struct sockaddr_in*)sa)->sin_addr);
    }

    return &(((struct sockaddr_in6*)sa)->sin6_addr);
}

int main(void)
{
    int sockfd;
    struct addrinfo hints, *servinfo, *p;
    int rv;
    int numbytes;
    int new_fd;
    socklen_t addr_size;
    struct sockaddr_storage their_addr;
    char buf[MAXBUFLEN];
    char s[INET6_ADDRSTRLEN];

    memset(&hints, 0, sizeof hints);
    hints.ai_family = AF_UNSPEC; // set to AF_INET to force IPv4
    hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;
    hints.ai_flags = AI_PASSIVE; // use my IP

    if ((rv = getaddrinfo(NULL, MYPORT, &hints, &servinfo)) != 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "getaddrinfo: %s\n", gai_strerror(rv));
        return 1;
    }

    // loop through all the results and bind to the first we can
    for(p = servinfo; p != NULL; p = p->ai_next) {
        if ((sockfd = socket(p->ai_family, p->ai_socktype,
                p->ai_protocol)) == -1) {
            perror("listener: socket");
            continue;
        }

        int yes=1;

        // lose the pesky "Address already in use" error message
        if (setsockopt(sockfd,SOL_SOCKET,SO_REUSEADDR,&yes,sizeof(int)) == -1) {
            perror("setsockopt");
            exit(1);
        }

        if (bind(sockfd, p->ai_addr, p->ai_addrlen) == -1) {
            close(sockfd);
            perror("listener: bind");
            continue;
        }

        if (listen(sockfd,BACKLOG) == -1){
            close(sockfd);
            perror("listener:listen");
            continue;
        }

        break;
    }

    if (p == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "listener: failed to bind socket\n");
        return 2;
    }

    freeaddrinfo(servinfo);

    printf("listener: waiting to recv..\n");
    while(1){
        addr_size = sizeof their_addr;
        if ((new_fd = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&their_addr, &addr_size))==-1){
            perror("accept");
            exit(1);
        }
        printf("Maxbuflen: %d\n",MAXBUFLEN);
        if ((numbytes = recv(new_fd, buf, MAXBUFLEN-1 , 0) == -1)) {
            perror("recv");
            exit(1);
        }

        printf("listener: got packet from %s\n",
            inet_ntop(their_addr.ss_family,
                get_in_addr((struct sockaddr *)&their_addr),
                s, sizeof s));
        printf("listener: packet is %d bytes long\n", numbytes);
        buf[numbytes] = '\0';
        printf("listener: packet contains \"%s\"\n", buf);

        close(new_fd);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
More code please. How did you acquire sockfd and new_fd? Are sockfd and new_fd really connected? to each other? Are you sure argv[2] isn't ""? –  EJP Jun 11 '14 at 23:49
    
How can I ensure the 2 are connected? the server does receive something from the client, its just 0 which is what I don't understand –  TheoretiCAL Jun 11 '14 at 23:58
1  
No idea, but you must call perror() before calling other system calls such as close(), otherwise you don't print the right error. I would try it with AF_INET instead of AF_UNSPEC, and I would also try it with ai_addr = INADDR_ANY in the server, instead of searching the getaddrinfo() results. –  EJP Jun 12 '14 at 0:20
    
The problem is the code never errors so perror isn't called. –  TheoretiCAL Jun 12 '14 at 15:48

1 Answer 1

recv() returns 0 when the socket has been closed by the other party, in this case your client.

share|improve this answer
    
send() returning 0 is not what causes recv() to return 0. It is the close() after the send() that does it. Since send() is not sending anything, there is nothing for recv() to read. Given the code you have shown, the only way send() could return 0 is if strlen(argv[2]) is returning 0. –  Remy Lebeau Jun 12 '14 at 1:38
    
printing strlen(argv[2]) before the send results in 4 –  TheoretiCAL Jun 12 '14 at 15:46

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