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What is the difference between using File.separator and a normal / in a Java Path-String?

In contrast to double backslash \\ platform independence seems not to be the reason, since both versions work under Windows and Unix (please correct me if I am wrong here).

public class SlashTest {
 @Test
 public void slash() throws Exception {
  File file = new File("src/trials/SlashTest.java");
  assertThat(file.exists(), is(true));
 }

 @Test
 public void separator() throws Exception {
  File file = new File("src" + File.separator + "trials" + File.separator + "SlashTest.java");
  assertThat(file.exists(), is(true));
 }
}

To rephrase the question, if / works on Unix and Windows, why should one ever use want to use File.separator.

Thank you.

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Because historical reasons. –  Ring Feb 21 '13 at 6:46
    
@Ring 'Historical reasons' such as what? –  EJP Jul 15 at 6:47

8 Answers 8

up vote 74 down vote accepted

With the Java libraries for dealing with files, you can safely use / (slash, not backslash) on all platforms. The library code handles translating things into platform-specific paths internally.

You might want to use File.separator in UI, however, because it's best to show people what will make sense in their OS, rather than what makes sense to Java.

Update: I have not been able, in five minutes of searching, to find the "you can always use a slash" behavior documented. Now, I'm sure I've seen it documented, but in the absense of finding an official reference (because my memory isn't perfect), I'd stick with using File.separator because you know that will work.

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1  
This also might be a problem with the performance, since you are expecting the separator to be converted into something else at runtime. Also, do not expect this to happen in all the unsupported JVM's out there. –  jpabluz Mar 10 '10 at 14:28
3  
@T.J. Crowder: "I have not been able, in five minutes of searching, to find the 'you can always use a slash' behavior documented." It's not a feature of the JVM, it's a feature of Windows NT API. –  Powerlord Mar 10 '10 at 14:36
    
@jpabluz: A library implementation (not JVM) that doesn't do this is an implementation that's likely to fail miserably at running a wide variety of software. I very much doubt you'll find one in the wild. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 10 '10 at 14:41
8  
@Powerlord: If Windows does it as well, great -- but the library (not the JVM) does it as well. Specifically, File uses FileSystem.normalize all over the place to "normalize" paths received via the public API, and nearly anything that deals with file path strings (for instance, FileWriter(String)) uses File under the covers. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 10 '10 at 14:42

You use File.separator because someday your program might run on a platform developed in a far-off land, a land of strange things and stranger people, where horses cry and cows operate all the elevators. In this land, people have traditionally used the ":" character as a file separator, and so dutifully the JVM obeys their wishes.

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43  
+1 For the imaginative narrative –  Psytronic Mar 10 '10 at 14:20
2  
Yup, Pointy really tooks us in elbonia (hope he has no pointy haircut ;-) (geek pun inside) –  Riduidel Mar 10 '10 at 14:28
    
"...and cows operate all the elevators." Just as well I wasn't taking a sip of my coffee when I read that. Brilliant. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 10 '10 at 16:13
11  
There is such a land where : is the separator, known as Mac OS Classic. I can't say whether cows operate the elevators, but I've heard they bear some similarities to dogs... –  Adam Brenecki Oct 12 '12 at 5:50
    
:D This answer is a nice way to start off a Friday :) +1 –  Ashutosh Jindal Apr 5 '13 at 9:44

Although using File.separator to reference a file name is overkill (for those who imagine far off lands, I imagine their JVM implementation would replace a / with a : just like the windows jvm replaces it with a \).

However, sometimes you are getting the file reference, not creating it, and you need to parse it, and to be able to do that, you need to know the separator on the platform. File.separator helps you do that.

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Well, there are more OS's than Unix and Windows (Portable devices, etc), and Java is known for its portability. The best practice is to use it, so the JVM could determine which one is the best for that OS.

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Although it doesn't make much difference on the way in, it does on the way back.

Sure you can use either '/' or '\' in new File(String path), but File.getPath() will only give you one of them.

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portability plain and simple.

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The pathname for a file or directory is specified using the naming conventions of the host system. However, the File class defines platform-dependent constants that can be used to handle file and directory names in a platform-independent way.

Files.seperator defines the character or string that separates the directory and the file com- ponents in a pathname. This separator is '/', '\' or ':' for Unix, Windows, and Macintosh, respectively.

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If you are using Java 7, checkout Path.resolve() and Paths.get().

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