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I'm trying to several levels indent a file based on a marker. The marker argument only signifies that the next word on the same line is a second level marker. Based on this second level marker, I'd like to indent everything up until the next occurrence of that second level marker.

The reason I'm trying to do this is for debugging another application. I'm printing out data at the top and before returns of every function (and several things in between).

Thanks in advance!

Usage would be something like this: ./script.sh file marker

Example data:

data
thismarker m1
thismarker m2
data
data
thismarker m2
data
data
thismarker m1
data

Desired output of ./script.sh file thismarker:

data
data
thismarker m1
 thismarker m2
      data
      data
 thismarker m2
 data
 data
thismarker m1
data

Here is what I have so far. I'm currently using awk but I'll be happy with anything that works. It doesn't work with multiple levels though and I don't know how to use mymarkertwo instead of what I'm currently doing - hard coding hcmarkertwo.

#!/bin/bash                                                                      

file_path=$1                                                                     
markerone=$2                                                                     

 cat ${file_path} | awk -v mone="$markerone" '                                    
    BEGIN {                                                                  
            get_out=0;                                                       
            myfunc="";                                                       
    } {                                                                      

            if ( /${mone}/ ) {                                               
                    mymarkertwo = $2                                         
            }                                                                

            if ( /hcmarkertwo/ ) {                                           
                    get_out=0                                                
                    print $0                                                 
                    getline                                                  

                    do {                                                     
                            if ( /hcmarkertwo/ ) {                           
                                    get_out = 1                              
                                    print $0                                 
                                    getline                                  
                            } else {                                         
                                    $0 = "\t"$0                              
                                    print $0                                 
                                    getline                                  
                            }                                                
                    } while ( get_out == 0 )                                 
            }                                                                
    print $0                                                                 
}
'
share|improve this question
    
Important question: do your markers + labels need to occur in matching pairs? Could both nested levels of indentation via m1 and m2 opening markers be terminated by the top level marker m1 occurring a second time? (If not, then the extra m1 and m2 labels are redundant.) –  Joseph Myers Jun 12 at 3:40
    
Using getline is usually wrong (it is in this case) - read and fully understand awk.info/?tip/getline if you're considering using it in future. –  Ed Morton Jun 12 at 12:29
    
Thanks everyone for some great answers! Yes, the markers and labels always occur in matching pairs. –  user2162449 Jun 12 at 18:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
$ cat tst.awk
$1 == marker {
    if ($2 == markerId[depth]) {
        --depth
        nextIndent = --indent
    }
    else {
        markerId[++depth] = $2
        nextIndent = indent + 1
    }
}
{
    printf "%*s%s\n",indent,"",$0
    indent = nextIndent
}

.

$ cat file
data
thismarker m1
thismarker m2
data
thismarker m1
data
data
thismarker m1
data
thismarker m2
data
data
thismarker m1
data

.

$ awk -v marker="thismarker" -f tst.awk file
data
thismarker m1
 thismarker m2
  data
  thismarker m1
   data
   data
  thismarker m1
  data
 thismarker m2
 data
 data
thismarker m1
data

Note that I modified your sample input file to show a case where you have m1 within the scope of m2 within the scope of a previous m1 as that can typically happen with function calls and it makes a solution more complicated than if it doesn't need to be accounted for. The currently posted sed solution will fail given that input, I don't have perl on my current UNIX box and I couldn't begin to guess at what the currently posted perl incantation says so I've no idea if that'd work or not - try it if you have perl.

share|improve this answer

Using a perl one-liner:

perl -lne '
    ($m) = $_ =~ /thismarker (\S+)/;
    pop(@M), $m = "" if $m && @M && $M[-1] eq $m;
    print +("   " x @M), $_;
    push @M, $m if $m;
  ' file.txt

Explanation:

Switches:

  • -l: Enable line ending processing, specifies line terminator
  • -n: Creates a while(<>){..} loop for each line in your input file.
  • -e: Tells perl to execute the code on command line.

Code:

  • $m contains current line's matched marker: 'm1' or 'm2'
  • @M contains a stack of matched markers.
share|improve this answer
    
one-liner? I installed perl 5.14.4 on cygwin to try the above and got syntax error at -e line 3, near "= if" syntax error at -e line 4, at EOF. Some meaningful variable names might improve the readability, right now the script is complete hieroglyphics to those of us who don't know perl. –  Ed Morton Jun 12 at 12:47
1  
Nice catch. In moving from windows to unix style, I failed to translate my single quoted strings to double quoted. This is fixed. –  Miller Jun 12 at 18:43

You need to manage a stack of levels in order to process this properly. In pseudocode

line <- file.read
if line.words[0] == "thismarker"
    if line == stack.top
      stack.pop
      print(indent=stack.size) line
    else
      print(indent=stack.size) line
      stack.push(line)
    endif
 else
   print(indent=stack.size) line
endif
share|improve this answer
sed '/thismarker m1/,/thismarker m1/{
   /thismarker m1/!s/^/   /
   /thismarker m2/,/thismarker m2/{
      /thismarker m2/!s/^/   /
      }
   }' YourFile

same concept if several level (just add a new section before the end of last level)

/thismarker mX/,/thismarker mX/{
   /thismarker mX/!s/^/   /
   }

Explanation:

Between 2 marker of same reference (/thismarker mX/,/thismarker mX/) [marker are not on the same line, it's mandatory but request specify it by it's structure], for each line without the specific marker (/thismarker mX/ !), substitute the beginning of the line with 3 space (s/^/ /). The second level is done by the same way but inside the "loop" of first level. A thrd level should do the same inside the "loop" of second level, etc ...

share|improve this answer
    
Explanation please ? –  Jidder Jun 12 at 7:24
    
added in post directly –  NeronLeVelu Jun 12 at 7:52

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