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I have the following tables:

CREATE TABLE Salesperson 
(
    id INT, 
    name VARCHAR(30), 
    age INT,
    salary INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (id)  
);

CREATE TABLE Orders
(
    Number INT, 
    ORDER_DATE DATE, 
    cust_id INT, 
    salesperson_id INT, 
    Amount INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (Number),
    FOREIGN KEY (salesperson_id) REFERENCES Salesperson (id)
);

I would describe the foreign key relationship as a many-to-one, non-mandatory-to-mandatory relationship between the referencing (child) table Orders to the referenced (parent) table Salesperson.

However, MySQL Workbench describes the relationship as a one-to-many, mandatory-to-non-mandatory relationship betweenthe referencing table (child) table Orders to the referenced table (parent table) Salesperson.

Is it me, or MySQL Workbench that has it backwards? An explanation would be appreciated.

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Update I found this definition of "Mandatory" under the MySQL Workbench docs:

The Mandatory check boxes are used to select whether the referencing table and the referenced table are mandatory. By default, both of these constraints are true (indicated by the check boxes being checked).

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The relationship is in both directions. Or, you can think of it as two halves of the same relationship.

A foreign key relationship like this typically called 'one-to-many', rather than 'many-to-one'. MySQL workbench is referring to it using the normative pattern.

FOLLOWUP

Q: why is Orders.salesperson_id mandatory, while Salesperson.id non-mandatory? Salesperson.id is a primary key, and Orders.salesperson_id is not a primary key, so wouldn't the check boxes be reversed?

A: I'm not familiar with the checkboxes in MySQL workbench.

As Mike Lischke points out in his comment, what we're concerned with at the Entity-Relationship modeling level is the "cardinality" of the relationship. Basically, we're asking the questions, Do we require that an Order be related to a Salesperson? That is, can we have an Order that is not related to a Salesperson?

Can we have Salesperson that is not related to an Order?

And obviously we've already answered the questions, can a Salesperson be related to more than one Order? Can an Order be related to more than one Salesperson? That's how we determined that this is a one-to-many relationship. Now we're just further refining the cardinality.

I think the "Mandatory" checkbox in the UI is meant to answer the question: Can we create an instance of Salesperson that is not related to an Order, or do we require a Salesperson to be related to at least one Order?

Again, the questions make sense if we view this as two relationships we're asking questions about. We're asking questions about the relationship from Salesperson to Order, and also about the relationship from Order to Salesperson.

Based on the answers to our questions, we mark Order.salesperson_id as "mandatory" to indicate that we are going to require that an Order be related to a Salesperson. We mark the other direction of the relationship as "non-mandatory" to indicate that we are not going to require that a Salesperson be related to an Order.

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Ah, I see, one-to-many is just a label for the relationship type. But why is Orders.salesperson_id mandatory, while Salesperson.id non-mandatory? Salesperson.id is a primary key, and Orders.salesperson_id is not a primary key, so wouldn't the check boxes be reversed? I update info with the "Mandatory" definition. –  Lucas Jun 12 '14 at 5:43
1  
It's not the relationship type but the cardinality. It determines how many occurances are allowed (non-mandatory means 0..1 or 0..n cardinality, while mandatory means exactly one or 1..n). –  Mike Lischke Jun 12 '14 at 6:54

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