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I'm trying to read some OpenGL tutorials on the net. the problem is that I found some old ones that use gluPerspective(). gluPerspective was deprecated in OpenGL 3.0 and removed in 3.1.

What function can I use instead?

I'm using C++ with latest FreeGlut installed.

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4  
I know it's pedantic, but gluPerspective has never been part of OpenGL (hence the glu prefix). glFrustum was, and has been deprecated. –  Bahbar Mar 10 '10 at 20:32
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5 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You have to compute the matrix manually and then pass it to OpenGL.

Computing the matrix

This snippet of code was lifted from geeks3d via opengl.org.

 void BuildPerspProjMat(float *m, float fov, float aspect,
 float znear, float zfar)
 {
  float ymax = znear * tan(fov * PI_OVER_360);
  float ymin = -ymax;
  float xmax = ymax * aspect;
  float xmin = ymin * aspect;

  float width = xymax - xmin;
  float height = xymax - ymin;

  float depth = zfar - znear;
  float q = -(zfar + znear) / depth;
  float qn = -2 * (zfar * znear) / depth;

  float w = 2 * znear / width;
  w = w / aspect;
  float h = 2 * znear / height;

  m[0]  = w;
  m[1]  = 0;
  m[2]  = 0;
  m[3]  = 0;

  m[4]  = 0;
  m[5]  = h;
  m[6]  = 0;
  m[7]  = 0;

  m[8]  = 0;
  m[9]  = 0;
  m[10] = q;
  m[11] = -1;

  m[12] = 0;
  m[13] = 0;
  m[14] = qn;
  m[15] = 0;
 }

There is a C++ library called OpenGL Mathematics that may be useful.

Loading the Matrix in OpenGL 3.1

I am still new to the OpenGL 3.1 API, but you need to update a matrix on the GPU and then make use of it in your vertex shader to get the proper perspective. The following code just loads the matrix using glUniform4fv onto the video card.

{
  glUseProgram(shaderId);
  glUniformMatrix4fv(glGetUniformLocation(shaderId, "u_proj_matrix"),
                     1, GL_FALSE, theProjectionMatrix);
  RenderObject();
  glUseProgram(0);
}

A simple vertex shader from a random blog (found through stack overflow).

attribute vec4      a_position;
attribute vec4      a_color;

varying vec4        v_color;

uniform mat4 u_proj_matrix;
uniform mat4 u_model_matrix;

void main() {
  mat4 mvp_matrix = u_proj_matrix * u_model_matrix;
  v_color = a_color;
  gl_Position = mvp_matrix * a_position;
}
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thank you :) that opengl mathematics library seems not bad at all. –  ufk Mar 11 '10 at 17:11
    
Perfect! Thanks for sharing. –  Xavier Ho Apr 26 '10 at 18:43
2  
I worked through the maths for gluPerspective and glFrustum. It may be neater to write width = xmax-xmin and height = ymax-ymin; following which the line w = w/aspect will not be required. –  koan Nov 18 '10 at 15:25
4  
I want to add, that as koan states, w = w/aspect MUST be removed from the computation as it stands now for the matrix to work correctly. I used this matrix myself and couldn't figure out why the aspect was wrong whenever I used anything other than 1 as aspect. Also width = xymax - xmin should be width = xmax - xmin, and height = xymax - ymin should be height = ymax - ymin. –  DaedalusAlpha May 5 '11 at 9:32
2  
It should also be pointed out that "fov" is the vertical fov. It's easy to accidentally specify the horizontal fov, as that's typically what games speak in terms of. –  luke Oct 5 '11 at 14:55
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Copied from one of my older projects:

// The following code is a fancy bit of math that is eqivilant to calling:
// gluPerspective( fieldOfView/2.0f, width/height , 0.1f, 255.0f )
// We do it this way simply to avoid requiring glu.h
GLfloat zNear = 0.1f;
GLfloat zFar = 255.0f;
GLfloat aspect = float(width)/float(height);
GLfloat fH = tan( float(fieldOfView / 360.0f * 3.14159f) ) * zNear;
GLfloat fW = fH * aspect;
glFrustum( -fW, fW, -fH, fH, zNear, zFar );
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7  
Except glFrustum() was deprecated in 3.1 also. –  genpfault Mar 10 '10 at 15:22
    
Really? Shame, that. –  Toji Mar 10 '10 at 23:38
    
why do you divide the fieldOfView by 2.0f in gluPerspective. It is specified in the specs that you should use the full fov... –  meduz May 28 '13 at 16:15
    
@genpfault Yes, modern OpenGL requires you to deal in matrices for transformation. –  bobobobo Aug 2 '13 at 1:43
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Use GLM.

glm::mat4 projection = glm::perspective(
  // FOV & aspect
  60.0f, 16.0f / 10.0f, 
  // Near and far planes
  0.001, 1000);

// If you're using the now deprecated matrix stacks
glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadMatrixf(glm::value_ptr(projection));

// if you're using the new shader based pipelines
GLint projectionUniformLocation = ...;
glUniformMatrix4fv(projectionUniformLocation, 1, GL_FALSE, 
  glm::value_ptr(projection));
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This is a modified version of Dan's function, with simplified calculations from Unspecified Behavior.

void buildPerspProjMat(GLfloat *m, GLfloat fov, GLfloat aspect,
GLfloat znear, GLfloat zfar){

  GLfloat h = tan(fov);
  GLfloat w = h / aspect;
  GLfloat depth = znear - zfar;
  GLfloat q = (zfar + znear) / depth;
  GLfloat qn = 2 * zfar * znear / depth;

  m[0]  = w;  m[1]  = 0;  m[2]  = 0;  m[3]  = 0;

  m[4]  = 0;  m[5]  = h;  m[6]  = 0;  m[7]  = 0;

  m[8]  = 0;  m[9]  = 0;  m[10] = q;  m[11] = -1;

  m[12] = 0;  m[13] = 0;  m[14] = qn;  m[15] = 0;
}
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The formula for various perspective matrices is documented in the Direct3D documentation.

Here is the formulation for D3DXMatrixPerspectiveFovRH, the right-handed perspective projection matrix:

yScale = cot(fovY/2)
xScale = yScale / aspect ratio

xScale     0          0              0
0        yScale       0              0
0        0        zf/(zn-zf)        -1
0        0        zn*zf/(zn-zf)      0
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