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I am using the following code for validating date.the code is working fine for days and months but its accepting the more than 5 digit year value but in the format i have specified "yyyy".

Question: why it is returning true in case of 21114 because its not a valid date with respect to my specified format.?

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;

public class raju {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        boolean a=raju.isThisDateValid("12/12/21114","MM/dd/yyyy");
        System.out.println(a);
    }


    public static boolean isThisDateValid(String dateToValidate, String dateFromat){

        if(dateToValidate == null){
            return false;
        }

        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat(dateFromat);
        sdf.setLenient(false);

        try {

            //if not valid, it will throw ParseException
            Date date = sdf.parse(dateToValidate);
            System.out.println(date);

        } catch (ParseException e) {

            e.printStackTrace();
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

}
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@ElliottFrisch The OP already call that. –  Abdul Fatir Jun 12 at 5:38
    
Are you creating a Y9999 (use 9216, then it's a Y9K) problem? Just check that the year you get back is less then equal to 9999. –  Elliott Frisch Jun 12 at 5:39
    
@ElliottFrisch thanks for the response but this code checks if it it a valid date or not so it should return false if i am using greater than 9999..is not it???but why it is returning true?? –  R R Jun 12 at 5:41
    
@ElliottFrisch but the format i have specified it "yyyy" not "yyyyy" –  R R Jun 12 at 5:43
2  
Can't we call it a Y10k problem? It's snappier and that's the first date that causes the problem. –  weston Jun 12 at 5:44

5 Answers 5

From the SimpleDateFormat javadoc,

Otherwise, calendar system specific forms are applied. For both formatting and parsing, if the number of pattern letters is 4 or more, a calendar specific long form is used. Otherwise, a calendar specific short or abbreviated form is used.

For the behavior you seem to want you'll need to check the year is less then 10000.

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Looking at the documentation, it appears that if the exact number of digits you specify isn't provided, the value is treated literally.

For example:

"yyyy" with 12 passed in will be successfully parsed as 12 A.D. (not 2012)

"yyyy" with 21114 passed in will be successfully parsed as 21114 A.D.

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Since you are using the parse(String) method of the DateFormat class which is extended by the SimpleDateFormat here is what the javadoc of parse method reads:

Parses text from the beginning of the given string to produce a date. The method may not use the entire text of the given string.

The javadoc of parse(String,ParsePosition) reads:

By default, parsing is lenient: If the input is not in the form used by this object's format method but can still be parsed as a date, then the parse succeeds. Clients may insist on strict adherence to the format by calling setLenient(false).

This parsing operation uses the calendar to produce a Date. As a result, the calendar's date-time fields and the TimeZone value may have been overwritten, depending on subclass implementations. Any TimeZone value that has previously been set by a call to setTimeZone may need to be restored for further operations.

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The format when used for parsing is more about the order of the components and the separators.

I would expect it not to mind if the input omitted leading 0s on the days or months even though it explicitly says to expect 2 digits. And so the year is also not a strict count of digits.

In practice if you want to check the year is valid you need to do another step. After all in most applications even the year 9999 would not make sense. So if you allow that then why not 10k?

Aside

Java is Y10k compliant. In fact it is Y1,000,000 complient. It won't parse 1/1/10000000 (10 million) though!

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The problem is with the way dates work in java, 21114 is a valid year according to java in the format YYYY. As its already well explianed by Westos and bstar55, about java and date formats. A solution to this might be adding your own validations to make sure date format is the way you need. For example if you need the date to be like this dd (not more than 2 digits), month (not more than 2 digits ) and year (not more than 4 digits)

public static void main(String[] args) {
    boolean a= isThisDateValid("12/12/21114","MM/dd/yyyy");
    System.out.println(a);
}


public static boolean isThisDateValid(String dateToValidate, String dateFromat){

    if(dateToValidate == null){
        return false;
    }

    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat(dateFromat);
    sdf.setLenient(false);

   String[] Arr=dateToValidate.split("/");

    try {

        if(Arr[0].length()>2 || Arr[1].length()>2 || Arr[2].length()>4){


            throw new ParseException("Error in date: "+dateToValidate,0);
        }
        //if not valid, it will throw ParseException
        Date date = sdf.parse(dateToValidate);
        System.out.println(date);

    } catch (ParseException e) {

        e.printStackTrace();
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}
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