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I am using matplotlib and numpy to make a polar plot. Here is some sample code:

import numpy as N
import matplotlib.pyplot as P

angle = N.arange(0, 360, 10, dtype=float) * N.pi / 180.0
arbitrary_data = N.abs(N.sin(angle)) + 0.1 * (N.random.random_sample(size=angle.shape) - 0.5)

P.clf()
P.polar(angle, arbitrary_data)
P.show()

You will notice that 0° is at 3 o'clock on the plot, and the angles go counterclockwise. It would be more useful for my data visualization purposes to have 0° at 12 o'clock and have the angles go clockwise. Is there any way to do this besides rotating the data and manually changing the axis labels?

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You've probably realised that rotating the data isn't quite what you want to do -- you want to reflect it across y==x. –  High Performance Mark Mar 10 '10 at 15:00
    
Er, you're right -- but the question is still how to do it without manipulating the data at all, just the plot. –  ptomato Mar 10 '10 at 16:22
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5 Answers 5

Updating this question, in Matplotlib 1.1, there are now two methods in PolarAxes for setting the theta direction (CW/CCW) and location for theta=0.

Check out http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/devel/add_new_projection.html#matplotlib.projections.polar.PolarAxes

Specifically, see set_theta_direction() and set_theta_offset().

Lots of people attempting to do compass-like plots it seems.

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up vote 15 down vote accepted

I found it out -- matplotlib allows you to create custom projections. I created one that inherits from PolarAxes.

import numpy as N
import matplotlib.pyplot as P

from matplotlib.projections import PolarAxes, register_projection
from matplotlib.transforms import Affine2D, Bbox, IdentityTransform

class NorthPolarAxes(PolarAxes):
    '''
    A variant of PolarAxes where theta starts pointing north and goes
    clockwise.
    '''
    name = 'northpolar'

    class NorthPolarTransform(PolarAxes.PolarTransform):
        def transform(self, tr):
            xy   = N.zeros(tr.shape, N.float_)
            t    = tr[:, 0:1]
            r    = tr[:, 1:2]
            x    = xy[:, 0:1]
            y    = xy[:, 1:2]
            x[:] = r * N.sin(t)
            y[:] = r * N.cos(t)
            return xy

        transform_non_affine = transform

        def inverted(self):
            return NorthPolarAxes.InvertedNorthPolarTransform()

    class InvertedNorthPolarTransform(PolarAxes.InvertedPolarTransform):
        def transform(self, xy):
            x = xy[:, 0:1]
            y = xy[:, 1:]
            r = N.sqrt(x*x + y*y)
            theta = N.arctan2(y, x)
            return N.concatenate((theta, r), 1)

        def inverted(self):
            return NorthPolarAxes.NorthPolarTransform()

    def _set_lim_and_transforms(self):
        PolarAxes._set_lim_and_transforms(self)
        self.transProjection = self.NorthPolarTransform()
        self.transData = (
            self.transScale + 
            self.transProjection + 
            (self.transProjectionAffine + self.transAxes))
        self._xaxis_transform = (
            self.transProjection +
            self.PolarAffine(IdentityTransform(), Bbox.unit()) +
            self.transAxes)
        self._xaxis_text1_transform = (
            self._theta_label1_position +
            self._xaxis_transform)
        self._yaxis_transform = (
            Affine2D().scale(N.pi * 2.0, 1.0) +
            self.transData)
        self._yaxis_text1_transform = (
            self._r_label1_position +
            Affine2D().scale(1.0 / 360.0, 1.0) +
            self._yaxis_transform)

register_projection(NorthPolarAxes)

angle = N.arange(0, 360, 10, dtype=float) * N.pi / 180.0
arbitrary_data = (N.abs(N.sin(angle)) + 0.1 * 
    (N.random.random_sample(size=angle.shape) - 0.5))

P.clf()
P.subplot(1, 1, 1, projection='northpolar')
P.plot(angle, arbitrary_data)
P.show()
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1  
Awesome, this should be included with their custom projection examples. –  Mark Mar 12 '10 at 19:04
1  
I'd recommend it be incorporated into the codebase. –  Carl F. Sep 18 '11 at 17:23
    
Any idea how to get this working with FigureCanvasGTKAgg? –  Sardathrion Jul 2 '12 at 12:41
    
What doesn't work? –  ptomato Jul 2 '12 at 21:32
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To expand klimaat's answer with an example:

import math
angle=[0.,5.,10.,15.,20.,25.,30.,35.,40.,45.,50.,55.,60.,65.,70.,75.,\
       80.,85.,90.,95.,100.,105.,110.,115.,120.,125.]

angle = [math.radians(a) for a in angle]


lux=[12.67,12.97,12.49,14.58,12.46,12.59,11.26,10.71,17.74,25.95,\
     15.07,7.43,6.30,6.39,7.70,9.19,11.30,13.30,14.07,15.92,14.70,\
     10.70,6.27,2.69,1.29,0.81]

import matplotlib.pyplot as P
import matplotlib
P.clf()
sp = P.subplot(1, 1, 1, projection='polar')
sp.set_theta_zero_location('N')
sp.set_theta_direction(-1)
P.plot(angle, lux)
P.show()
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You could modify your matplotlib/projections/polar.py.

Where it says:

def transform(self, tr):
        xy   = npy.zeros(tr.shape, npy.float_)
        t    = tr[:, 0:1]
        r    = tr[:, 1:2]
        x    = xy[:, 0:1]
        y    = xy[:, 1:2]
        x[:] = r * npy.cos(t)
        y[:] = r * npy.sin(t)
        return xy

Make it say:

def transform(self, tr):
        xy   = npy.zeros(tr.shape, npy.float_)
        t    = tr[:, 0:1]
        r    = tr[:, 1:2]
        x    = xy[:, 0:1]
        y    = xy[:, 1:2]
        x[:] = - r * npy.sin(t)
        y[:] = r * npy.cos(t)
        return xy

I didn't actually try it, you may need to tweak x[:] and y[:] assignments to your taste. This change will affect all programs that use matplotlib polar plot.

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This is ingenious, but patching the code is kind of cheating, isn't it? However, you've given me an idea. Matplotlib allows you to create axes with any kind of transformation; perhaps I can write an alternate polar() function with the transform I'm looking for. –  ptomato Mar 11 '10 at 10:07
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Both invert routines should use the full path to the transforms:

return NorthPolarAxes.InvertedNorthPolarTransform()

and

return NorthPolarAxes.NorthPolarTransform()

Now, automatically created subclasses of NorthPolarAxes such as NorthPolarAxesSubplot can access the transform functions.

Hope this helps.

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