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I have some javascript which catches changes to a form then calls the form's regular submit function. The form is a GET form (for a search) and i have lots of empty attributes come through in the params. What i'd like to do is to delete any empty attributes before submitting, to get a cleaner url: for example, if someone changes the 'subject' select to 'english' i want their search url to be

http://localhost:3000/quizzes?subject=English

rather than

http://localhost:3000/quizzes?term=&subject=English&topic=&age_group_id=&difficulty_id=&made_by=&order=&style=

as it is at the moment. This is just purely for the purpose of having a cleaner and more meaningful url to link to and for people's bookmarks etc. So, what i need is something along these lines, but this isn't right as i'm not editing the actual form but a js object made from the form's params:

  quizSearchForm = jQuery("#searchForm");
  formParams = quizSearchForm.serializeArray();
  //remove any empty fields from the form params before submitting, for a cleaner url
  //this won't work as we're not changing the form, just an object made from it.
  for (i in formParams) {
    if (formParams[i] === null || formParams[i] === "") {
      delete formParams[i];
    }
  }
  //submit the form

I think i'm close with this, but i'm missing the step of how to edit the actual form's attributes rather than make another object and edit that.

grateful for any advice - max

EDIT - SOLVED - thanks to the many people who posted about this. Here's what i have, which seems to work perfectly.

function submitSearchForm(){
  quizSearchForm = jQuery("#searchForm");
  //disable empty fields so they don't clutter up the url
  quizSearchForm.find(':input[value=""]').attr('disabled', true);
  quizSearchForm.submit();
}
share|improve this question
4  
Can I just say, it's very cool your thinking of your users like that. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 10 '10 at 15:14
    
Good question and nice answers: I have a big search form and most of the time only one field gets filled. Now the URLs are much shorter. –  guettli Oct 29 '12 at 10:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The inputs with attribute disabled set to true won't be submitted with the form. So in one jQuery line:

$(':input[value=""]').attr('disabled', true);
share|improve this answer
1  
Then why not just: $(':input[value=""]').attr('disabled', true); –  Marko Dumic Mar 10 '10 at 15:26
1  
If you also want the unchecked checkboxes (which had the value 0) use this: .find(':input').filter('[value=""],:checkbox[checked=false]').attr('disabled', true); –  Cristian Jun 3 '11 at 14:03
6  
Using the disabled attribute will usually change the appearance of the inputs if you have styles for input[disabled]. If you remove the name of the element it will have the same effect since only inputs with names are submitted: $(':input[value=""]').attr('name', ''); –  ssorallen Mar 30 '12 at 1:02
1  
Not fully working, you forgot the case where value is not defined, you must use also "$(':input:not([value])')" selector. –  Thomas Decaux Apr 22 '14 at 7:25
1  
Another problem: Inputs populated by user don't get submitted. This is because the actual value HTML attribute is not populated on user input (at least in latest Chrome...), so if this attribute was empty on page load, ':input[value=""]' returns true in all cases, even if a value was entered by the user. –  8y5 Jul 31 '14 at 7:26
$('form#searchForm').submit(function() {
    $(':input', this).each(function() {
        this.disabled = !($(this).val());
    });
});
share|improve this answer

You can't do it that way if you call the form's submit method; that will submit the entire form, not the array you've had jQuery create for you.

What you can do is disable the form fields that are empty prior to submitting the form; disabled fields are omitted from form submission. So walk through the form's elements and for each one that's empty, disable it, and then call the submit method on the form. (If its target is another window, you'll then want to go back and re-enable the fields. If its target is the current window, it doesn't matter, the page will be replaced anyway.)

share|improve this answer

Well one thing you could do would be to disable the empty inputs before calling "serializeArray"

$('#searchForm').find('input, textarea, select').each(function(_, inp) {
  if ($(inp).val() === '' || $(inp).val() === null)
    inp.disabled = true;
  }
});

The "serializeArray()" routine will not include those in its results. Now, you may need to go back and re-enable those if the form post is not going to result in a completely refreshed page.

share|improve this answer
    
If he's calling the form's own submit method, he doesn't need to call serializeArray at all. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 10 '10 at 15:13
    
Yes that's true, but the code sample cuts off, and he did after all call serializeArray in the first place. It'll work to disable the fields on a normal submit too, as you mention. –  Pointy Mar 10 '10 at 15:17

Your problem helped me figure out my situation, which is a bit different - so maybe someone else can benefit from it. Instead of directly submitting a form, I needed to prevent empty form elements from being collected into a serialized array which is then posted via AJAX.

In my case, I simply needed to loop through the form elements and disable all that were empty, and then collect the leftovers into an array like so:

// Loop through empty fields and disable them to prevent inclusion in array
$('#OptionB input, select').each(function(){
    if($(this).val()==''){
        $(this).attr('disabled', true); 
    }
});

// Collect active fields into array to submit
var updateData = $('#OptionB input, select').serializeArray();
share|improve this answer

Another approach I always recommend is to do that on server side, so you are able to:

  1. Validate the input data correctly
  2. Set default values
  3. Change input values if needed
  4. Have a clean URL or a friendly URL such as "/quizzes/english/level-1/"

Otherwise you will have to deal with text input, select, radio etc...

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Thomas. I do use server side validation too, but in this case what i wanted to achieve was a url where the only parameters in the search params were the none-empty ones. This doesn't make any difference server side but it gives nicer urls. –  Max Williams Apr 22 '14 at 8:31

Maybe some of the proposed solutions worked at the moment the question was made (March 2010) but today, August 2014, the solution of disabling empty inputs is just not working. The disabled fields are sended too in my Google Chrome. However, I tried removing the "name" attribute and it worked fine!

$('form').submit(function(){
    $(this).find('input[name], select[name]').each(function(){
        if (!$(this).val()){
            $(this).removeAttr('name');
        }
    });
});

Update: Ok, probably the reason because disabling fields doesn't worked to me is not that something changed since 2010. But still not working in my Google Chrome. I don't know, maybe is just in the linux version. Anyway, I think that removing the name attr is better since, despite what policy takes the browser about disabled fields, there is no way to send the parameters if the name attr is missing. Another advantage is that usually disabling fields implies some style changes, and is not nice to see a style change in the form a second before the form is finally submited. There is also a drawback, as Max Williams mentioned in the comments, since the remove name attr solution is not toggleable. Here is a way to avoid this problem:

$('form').submit(function(){
    $(this).find('input[name], select[name]').each(function(){
        if (!$(this).val()){
            $(this).data('name', $(this).attr('name'));
            $(this).removeAttr('name');
        }
    });
});

function recoverNames(){
    $(this).find('input[name], select[name]').each(function(){
        if ($(this).data('name')){
            $(this).attr('name', $(this).data('name'));
        }
    });
}

However, I think this is not a very common case since we are submitting the form so it is assumed that there is no need to recover the missing name attrs.

share|improve this answer
1  
I use chrome and disabling the inputs in a form means that they're not sent. I don't think this has changed since 2010. The problem with doing it via removing the name attribute is that it's not toggle-able, ie once you've removed the name you can't add it back, unless you saved it somewhere. –  Max Williams Aug 20 '14 at 8:40

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