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I have the following data as an example:

InputName  InputValue Output
===================================
Oxide        35        0.4
Oxide        35.2      0.42
Oxide        34.6      0.38
Oxide        35.9      0.46
CD           0.5       0.42
CD           0.48      0.4
CD           0.56      0.429

I want to do a linear regression of InputValue vs. Output treating different InputName as independent predictors.

If I want to use lm(Output ~ Oxide + CD) in R, it assumes a separate column for each predictor. In the example above that would mean making a separate column for Oxide and CD. I can do that using cast function from plyr package which might introduce NAs in the data.

However, is there a way to direct tell lm function that the input predictors are grouped according to the column InputName, and the values are given in the column Inputvalue?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems to me you are describing a form of dummy variable coding. This is not necessary in R at all, since any factor column in your data will automatically be dummy coded for you.

Recreate your data:

dat <- read.table(text="
InputName  InputValue Output
Oxide        35        0.4
Oxide        35.2      0.42
Oxide        34.6      0.38
Oxide        35.9      0.46
CD           0.5       0.42
CD           0.48      0.4
CD           0.56      0.429
", header=TRUE)

Now build the model you described, but drop the intercept to make things a little bit more explicit:

fit <- lm(Output ~ InputValue + InputName - 1, dat)
summary(fit)

Call:
lm(formula = Output ~ InputValue + InputName - 1, data = dat)

Residuals:
        1         2         3         4         5         6         7 
-0.003885  0.003412  0.001519 -0.001046  0.004513 -0.014216  0.009703 

Coefficients:
                Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
InputValue      0.063512   0.009864   6.439  0.00299 ** 
InputNameCD     0.383731   0.007385  51.962 8.21e-07 ***
InputNameOxide -1.819018   0.346998  -5.242  0.00633 ** 
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Residual standard error: 0.009311 on 4 degrees of freedom
Multiple R-squared:  0.9997,    Adjusted R-squared:  0.9995 
F-statistic:  4662 on 3 and 4 DF,  p-value: 1.533e-07

Notice how all of your factor levels for InputName appear in the output, giving you a separate estimate of the effect of each level.

Concisely, the information you need are in these two lines:

InputNameCD     0.383731   0.007385  51.962 8.21e-07 ***
InputNameOxide -1.819018   0.346998  -5.242  0.00633 ** 
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Hello Andrie, Thanks for the response. However, in your solution above I see "InputValue" as one of the independent variables in addition to InputNameCD and InputNameOxide. Is that correct? I have only 2 independent variables, (Input)Oxide and (Input)CD. why does it show a third independent variable "(Input)Value" ? –  Amit Jun 12 at 9:09
    
I think the OP is looking for an interaction term between InputValue and InputVariable to have 2 slopes. –  James Jun 12 at 9:16

Here are 2 ways of doing this, split the data and do the regressions separately, or use interaction terms to specify that you want to consider the different levels of InputName to have separate slopes:

Split

lapply(split(dat,dat$InputName),lm,formula=Output~InputValue)
$CD

Call:
FUN(formula = ..1, data = X[[1L]])

Coefficients:
(Intercept)   InputValue  
     0.2554       0.3135  


$Oxide

Call:
FUN(formula = ..1, data = X[[2L]])

Coefficients:
(Intercept)   InputValue  
   -1.78468      0.06254  

Interaction

lm(Output~InputName + InputName:InputValue - 1,dat)

Call:
lm(formula = Output ~ InputName + InputName:InputValue - 1, data = dat)

Coefficients:
              InputNameCD             InputNameOxide     InputNameCD:InputValue  InputNameOxide:InputValue  
                  0.25542                   -1.78468                    0.31346                    0.06254 

For comparision purposes I've also removed the intercept. Note that the estimated coefficients are the same in each case.

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