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Only 4 letters are showing up. Like in the example, I send the string "abcdef", but it only shows the 4 letters "abcf". I don't know why the other letters don't show up. I'm using Atmega8 and Bray terminal. I'm already following from the datasheet [http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/21822E.pdf][1]. But I've already found a dead end.

Implementation of functions

#include <avr/io.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <util/delay.h>

#define DD_SS       PINB2         //Chip select ON RC2
#define DD_MOSI     PINB3          // Master out - Slave in pin
#define DD_MISO     PINB4          // Master in - Slave out pin
#define DD_SCK      PINB5          // Clock from master
#define DDR_SPI     PORTB          // DDR_SPI

void serial_init(void)
{
    UBRRH = 0x00;
    UBRRL = 7;
    UCSRC = (1<<URSEL)|(1<<USBS)|(3<<UCSZ0)|(1 << UCSZ1); 
    UCSRB = (1 << RXEN) | (1 << TXEN)| (1<<RXCIE);
}
unsigned char Usart_Receive(void)           
{
    while ((UCSRA & (1 << RXC)) == 0) {};
    return UDR;
}


void Usart_Transmit(unsigned char c)   
{

    PORTD= 0b00000100;  //RTS Enable
    while ((UCSRA & (1 << UDRE)) == 0) {};
    UDR = c;
    PORTD= 0b00000000;  //RTS Disable
}
void SPI_MasterInit(void)
{
    DDRB = 0b00101100;
    DDR_SPI = (1<<DD_MOSI)|(1<<DD_SCK);
    SPCR = 0b01010000;
    SPSR = 0b00000001;
}
unsigned char spi_transfer(volatile char data)
{
    SPDR = data;
    while(!(SPSR & (1<<SPIF)));
    {
    }
    return SPDR;
}
void SPI_MasterTransmit (uint8_t Data)    
{
    uint16_t address;
    SPCR = (1<<SPE) | (1<<MSTR) | (0<<CPHA);
    DDR_SPI &= ~(1<<DD_SS);                // Select EEPROM
    spi_transfer(WREN);   // Send WRITE_ENABLE command
    DDR_SPI |= (1<<DD_SS);                // Release EEPROM
    DDR_SPI &= ~(1<<DD_SS);   //ss goes low             
    spi_transfer(WRITE); // write data to memory
    spi_transfer  (address>>8);   
    spi_transfer (address);
    spi_transfer(Data);
    DDR_SPI |= (1<<DD_SS);   //ss goes high
}
unsigned char SPI_MasterReceive(uint16_t address)   
{
    unsigned long data;
    SPCR = (1<<SPE) | (1<<MSTR) | (0<<CPHA);
    //waitBusy();
    DDR_SPI &= ~(1<<DD_SS);   //ss goes low
    spi_transfer(READ);  //enable write operation   
    spi_transfer (address>>8);  
    spi_transfer (address);
    data = spi_transfer(0xff);
    DDR_SPI |= (1<<DD_SS);   //goes high
    return data;
}

and this is main function

int main (void)
{
    char data;  
    unsigned char address;
    serial_init();
    SPI_MasterInit();
    while(1)
    {
      data = Usart_Receive();
      _delay_ms(10);
      SPI_MasterTransmit(data);
      _delay_ms(10);
      data = SPI_MasterReceive(address);    //read data from the memory
      _delay_ms(10); //pause for readability
      Usart_Transmit(data);     
    }           
    return 0;   
} 

I hope someone can help me here. :)

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried looking at what is on the UART pins with a logic analyser? My guess is that you are just not handling the characters fast enough, so some of them are getting "lost" - overwritten by new characters being received before the old one was processed. –  Vicky Jun 12 at 8:59
1  
The fundamental problem with your code is that it does not properly use the UART status register. Besides testing for received data, you also need to check for receive overrun, frame error, parity error and break condition. You probably are getting (but ignoring) an overrun condition when you fail to read the "de". Beware that a lot of status registers clear the bits when read, so all of the set status bits should be evaluated after the status register is read, or you will miss the one notification of that condition. –  sawdust Jun 15 at 7:36
    
@vicky what do you mean by "handing the character fast enough", it is have to do with baudrate or delay have to reduced it?. –  OooO Jun 16 at 1:48
    
@sawdust how to check whether status registers clear the bits when read? –  OooO Jun 16 at 1:58
1  
"how to check whether status registers clear the bits when read" -- You need to read the datasheet or technical reference manual for the UART or SoC. –  sawdust Jun 16 at 3:36

2 Answers 2

Your USART is transmitting too fast for your receiver. By your fourth time through the main loop, the USART transmitter has overwritten the "d" with "e" and then with "f".

A way to get around this is to use interrupts for receiving data, instead of polling like you are doing now. But you won't be able to write to the EEPROM as fast as the interrupts come. Instead, you should queue up the letters into a circular array or linked list or some other data structure as they arrive, and then write them to EEPROM in the main loop as time allows.

Note that this solution will only help with bursty data; you save up the burst and then deal with it as you can. But if the USART is continuously too fast, then you will never be able to keep up.

share|improve this answer
    
So you suggest me to using the interrupt with buffer. I already did try that. I am using interrupt with the fifo circular buffer. I follow same as this German site link . Uart with fifo buffer. But the resurt is, for a letter it came out perfect but when write many letter at once it came out ridiculous. I hope you understand what I mean. –  OooO Jun 16 at 4:13

To debug this issue you need to localise the place of problem and to do this you have to split your experiment on sub-tasks. One of them is to check UART separately, the code gets here like:

   while(1)
    {
      data = Usart_Receive();
      _delay_ms(10);
      Usart_Transmit(data);     
    }   

The second one is to check SPI apart from UART stuff if you have JTAG, or altogether if you get managed with making UART working. For the separate SPI checking just comment Usart_Receive(); and Usart_Transmit(data); initialize data with anything and probably increment it in the while. Hope this idea helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I have try the code without the spi as you said.But it just the same, only appear 4 letter like I said before. 'a'b'c'f' –  OooO Jun 16 at 2:40
    
So we stuck in UART, the problem is in there, at least, and probably SPI stuff is okay. What is the baud rate and CPU freq again? I just quickly scanned you question and did not see interrupt handlers. Does the whole program use them. If not, why? –  Ruslan Gerasimov Jun 16 at 3:12
    
I am using Baudrate 115200 and F_CPU 14745600. I dont using any interrupt, because before this I already using the intterupt but it only can appear 1 perfect letter the other letter is came out ridiculous. The baudrate and the F_CPU I already calculate it and set it as UBRRL as 7. –  OooO Jun 16 at 3:40
    
The fail of interrupt processing is not a reason to stop this way. It is rarely may be needed to avoid IRQs, so you are recommend to enable interrupts and work by them. So could you check please these examples and documentation from Atmel. Just run it as separate project and report here what happens. atmel.com/images/doc4346.pdf www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/avr306.zip atmel.com/Images/doc1451.pdf or google –  Ruslan Gerasimov Jun 16 at 4:52
    
I already try your [link](www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/avr306.zip) .The result "aaa{{ÿ{ÿÿ{{ÿ{{{{{" first I try to write a letter, after that I try to send a string, and that was the result. I also change this code from __interrupt void USART0_RX_interrupt( void ) to ISR(USART_RXC_vect ) Because in avr studio 5 it cannot read this code. The code that I have change it is correct? Your help is very helpful. I hope I do not trouble you. :) –  OooO Jun 16 at 7:50

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