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How to restart an iterator?

I have a list of columns names like this:

my_column_names = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "F", "G", "H"]

And I take a csv file with rows like this:

A,500
B,3.0
C,87
A,200
A,300
B,3.5
D,CALL
E,CLEAN
F,MADRID
G,28000
H,SPAIN
A,150
B,1.75
C,103
D,PUT

I want to make a csv file with this format:

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H
500,3.0,87,,,,,
200,,,,,,,
300,3.5,,CALL,CLEAN,MADRID,28000,SPAIN
150,1.75,103,PUT,,,,

My code:

iter_column_names = itertools.cycle(my_column_names)
my_new_line = []
for old_line in new_file:
    column_name = iter_column_names.__next__()
    if old_line[0] == column_name:
        my_new_line.append(old_line[1])
    else:
        my_new_line.append('')
    if column_name == "H":
        print(my_new_line)   # to change by writeline() when it works fine
        my_new_line = []

But it doesn't work like I need. I suppose that the problem is that it needs to restart de iter_column_names every time that it reaches "H" element. Or not?

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1  
You can just recreate the cycle() iterator, instead of 'restarting'. Your approach is not that suitable, however. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 12 at 10:10
    
Thanks @MartijnPieters. I've realized I'm wrong, but I don't found any solution. –  Trimax Jun 12 at 10:17
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd use a csv.DictWriter() and use a dictionary to handle the rows. That way you can detect if a column has been seen already, and start a new row:

import csv

fields = ('A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H')

with open('inputfile.csv', newline='') as infh, open('output.csv', 'w', newline='') as outfh:
    reader = csv.reader(infh)
    writer = csv.DictWriter(outfh, fields)
    writer.writeheader()
    row = {}
    for key, value in reader:
        if key in row:
            # new row found, write old
            writer.writerow(row)
            row = {}
        row[key] = value
    # write last row
    if row:
        writer.writerow(row)

Demo:

>>> import csv
>>> import sys
>>> infh = '''\
... A,500
... B,3.0
... C,87
... A,200
... A,300
... B,3.5
... D,CALL
... E,CLEAN
... F,MADRID
... G,28000
... H,SPAIN
... A,150
... B,1.75
... C,103
... D,PUT
... '''.splitlines()
>>> outfh = sys.stdout
>>> fields = ('A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H')
>>> if True:
...     reader = csv.reader(infh)
...     writer = csv.DictWriter(outfh, fields)
...     writer.writeheader()
...     row = {}
...     for key, value in reader:
...         if key in row:
...             # new row found, write old
...             writer.writerow(row)
...             row = {}
...         row[key] = value
...     # write last row
...     if row:
...         writer.writerow(row)
... 
A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H
500,3.0,87,,,,,
17
200,,,,,,,
12
300,3.5,,CALL,CLEAN,MADRID,28000,SPAIN
40
150,1.75,103,PUT,,,,
22

The numbers in between (17, 12, 40, 22) are the writer.writerow() return values (bytes written).

share|improve this answer
1  
@thefourtheye: indeed. The csv module wants to handle universal newline translation itself, so you need to switch that off at the file object. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 12 at 10:22
    
@thefourtheye: yup, building a demo I discovered that too. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Jun 12 at 10:23
    
My edit took too long :) –  Burhan Khalid Jun 12 at 10:30
    
for key, value in reader: ValueError: need more than 1 value to unpack –  Trimax Jun 12 at 11:14
1  
@Trimax: doesn't work is not a problem description. The code works just fine for the input data you've shown in your question. If the code doesn't work with your actual data, then there are crucial differences in your actual data. Find out what those differences are, and adjust the code. If you still have problems with that, perhaps asking a new question is the better option; comments really are not suited for extensive troubleshooting. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 12 at 11:36
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First, you probably shouldn't use the __next__() method. __xxx__ methods are rarely supposed to be used on their own (hence the double underscore awkwardness). The next() built-in method has the effect that you need. You could use the csv module, but sometimes a manual approach can be simpler:

for old_line in new_file:
    for column_name in my_column_names:
        if old_line[0] == column_name:
            my_new_line.append(old_line[1])
        else:
            my_new_line.append('')
        try:
            old_line = next(new_file)
        except StopIteration:
            break
    print ','.join(my_new_line)
    my_new_line = []

Note how the next is actually used on the (implicit) file line iterator, and instead we just loop over the column names.

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