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My question is an extension of this: Returning pointer to a local structure

I wrote the following code to create an empty list:

struct node* create_empty_list(void)
{
    struct node *head = NULL;
    return head;
}

I just read that returning pointers to local variables is useless, since the variable will be destroyed when the function exits. I believe the above code is returning a NULL pointer, so I don't think it's a pointer to a local variable.
Where is the memory allocated to the pointer in this case. I didn't allocate any memory on the heap, and it should be on the stack, as an automatic variable. But what happens when the code exits (to the pointer), if I try to use it in the program, by assigning this pointer some pointees / de-referencing and alike?

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1  
In this case, the memory for storing the pointer is allocated on the stack. You're returning the value of a local variable, which is perfectly fine. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jun 12 at 12:36
2  
You are returning a local variable, not a pointer to it!!! –  barak manos Jun 12 at 12:38
1  
@flipper: Yes, but then you should not dereference it –  user2793162 Jun 12 at 13:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
struct node* create_empty_list(void)
{
    struct node *head = NULL;
    return head;
}

is equivalent to:

struct node* create_empty_list(void)
{
    return NULL;
}

which is perfectly fine.

The problem would happen if you had something like:

 struct node head;
 return &head;  // BAD, returning a pointer to an automatic object
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Here, you are returning the value of a local variable, which is OK:

struct node* create_empty_list()
{
    struct node* head = NULL;
    return head;
}

The value of head, which happens to be NULL (0), is copied into the stack before function create_empty_list returns. The calling function would typically copy this value into some other variable.

For example:

void some_func()
{
    struct node* some_var = create_empty_list();
    ...
}

In each of the examples below, you would be returning the address of a local variable, which is not OK:

struct node* create_empty_list()
{
    struct node head = ...;
    return &head;
}

struct node** create_empty_list()
{
    struct node* head = ...;
    return &head;
}

The address of head, which may be a different address every time function create_empty_list is called (depending on the state of the stack at that point), is returned. This address, which is typically a 4-byte value or an 8-byte value (depending on your system's address space), is copied into the stack before the function returns. You may use this value "in any way you like", but you should not rely on the fact that it represents the memory address of a valid variable.


A few basic facts about variables, that are important for you to understand:

  • Every variable has an address and a value.
  • The address of a variable is constant (i.e., it cannot change after you declare the variable).
  • The value of a variable is not constant (unless you explicitly declare it as a const variable).
  • With the word pointer being used, it is implied that the value of the variable is by itself the address of some other variable. Nonetheless, the pointer still has its own address (which is unrelated to its value).

Please note that the description above does not apply for arrays.

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So, when a null pointer is declared, does it actually stores a NULL instead of the memory address, until it's assigned a pointee? –  flipper Jun 12 at 12:42
    
@flipper: Please see updated answer. –  barak manos Jun 12 at 12:55
1  
@flipper: I have added a few basic facts about variables, that are important for you to understand... –  barak manos Jun 12 at 13:19
    
@barakmanos: While &x is an l-value, not every l-value is &x. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bkbs2cds.aspx . In other words, I wouldn't say the address of a variable is "aka l-value". Otherwise - good explaination. –  stanm Jun 12 at 13:41
    
@stanm: It is not a good correlation, I agree, thank you for pointing that out. Answer updated accordingly (words l-value and r-value removed). –  barak manos Jun 12 at 13:45

As others have mentioned, you are returning value, what is perfectly fine.

However, if you had changed functions body to:

struct node head;
return &head;

you would return address (pointer to) local variable and that could be potentially dangerous as it is allocated on the stack and freed immediately after leaving function body.

If you changed your code to:

struct node * head = (struct node *) malloc( sizeof( struct node ) );;
return head;

Then you are returning value of local value, that is pointer to heap-allocated memory which will remain valid until you call free on it.

share|improve this answer

Answering

Where is the memory allocated to the pointer in this case. I didn't allocate any memory on the heap, and it should be on the stack, as an automatic variable. But what happens when the code exits (to the pointer), if I try to use it in the program, by assigning this pointer some pointees / de-referencing and alike?

There is no memory allocated to the pointer in your case. There is memory allocated to contain the pointer, which is on the stack, but since it is pointing to NULL it doesn't point to any usable memory. Also, you shouldn't worry about that your pointer is on the stack, because returning it would create a copy of the pointer.

(As others mentioned) memory is allocated on the stack implicitly when you declare objects in a function body. As you probably know (judging by your question), memory is allocated on the heap by explicitly requesting so (using malloc in C).

If you try to dereference your pointer you are going to get a segmentation fault. You can assign to it, as this would just overwrite the NULL value. To make sure you don't get a segmentation fault, you need to check that the list that you are using is not the NULL pointer. For example here is an append function:

struct node
{
    int elem;
    struct node* next;
};

struct node* append(struct node* list, int el) {
    // save the head of the list, as we would be modifying the "list" var
    struct node* res = list;

    // create a single element (could be a separate function)
    struct node* nn = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    nn->elem = el;
    nn->next = NULL;

    // if the given list is not empty
    if (NULL != list) {
        // find the end of the list
        while (NULL != list->next) list = list->next;

        // append the new element
        list->next = nn;
    } else {
        // if the given list is empty, just return the new element
        res = nn;
    }
    return res;
}

The crucial part is the if (NULL != list) check. Without it, you would try to dereference list, and thus get a segmentation fault.

share|improve this answer
    
A quick digression: Should we add a new element to front of the list, or at the end (as done above)? I don't see linked lists defining this property, and it seems everyone's appending wherever they like. What is the standard linked list behavior, if there is any? –  flipper Jun 13 at 14:51
1  
You can do both - they are different operations. Depending on what you need the list for, you can avoid writing one of them. –  stanm Jun 16 at 10:33

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