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How can I add public methods to my custom jQuery plugin which is based on this pattern from jquery-boilerplate: https://github.com/jquery-boilerplate/jquery-patterns/blob/master/patterns/jquery.extend-skeleton.js

I need to use my plugin and call public method something like this:

jQuery('.element').pluginName();

//And now assuming that plugin has a public method `examplePublicMethod`,
//I want to call it like this:
var instance = jQuery('#element').data('pluginName');
instance.examplePublicMethod();

Is it possible at all when I use this pattern from the link? Here's the code sample of this pattern:

;(function($){
    $.fn.extend({
        pluginName: function( options ) {

            this.defaultOptions = {};

            var settings = $.extend({}, this.defaultOptions, options);

            return this.each(function() {

                var $this = $(this);
                //And here is the main code of the plugin
                //...
                //And I'm not sure how to add here a public method
                //that will be accessible from outside the plugin

            });

        }

    });

})(jQuery);
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is multiple way to do this, but the one I prefer is like that :

$.fn.extend({
    pluginName: function( options ) {

        this.defaultOptions = {};

        var settings = $.extend({}, this.defaultOptions, options);

        return this.each(function() {

            var $this = $(this);

            //Create a new Object in the data.
            $this.data('pluginName', new pluginMethods($this)) //pluginMethod are define below

        });

    }

});

function pluginMethods($el){
    //Keep reference to the jQuery element
    this.$el = $el; 
    //You can define all variable shared between functions here with the keyword `this`
}

$.extend(pluginMethods.prototype, {
    //Here all you methods
    redFont : function(){
        //Simply changing the font color
        this.$el.css('color', 'red')
    }
})


$('#el').pluginName();

//Public method:
var instance = jQuery('#el').data('pluginName');
instance.redFont();

The disadvantage with that is pluginMethods is accessible by everyone. But you can solve that by moving it in the same closure that the plugin declaration like that :

(function($){
    $.fn.extend({
        pluginName: function( options ) {

            this.defaultOptions = {};

            var settings = $.extend({}, this.defaultOptions, options);

            return this.each(function() {

                var $this = $(this);

                $this.data('pluginName', new pluginMethods($this))

            });

        }

    });

    function pluginMethods($el){
        //Keep reference to the jQuery element
        this.$el = $el; 
    }

    $.extend(pluginMethods.prototype, {
        //Here all you methods
        redFont : function(){
            this.$el.css('color', 'red')
        }
    })

})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Is this way effective (in terms of performance and memory usage)? I will call my plugin on big collections of elements, e.g. jQuery('.element').pluginName(); there will be dozens of objects with class .element. I'm asking because there was another answer here (but looks like it is deleted now, I don't know why) and there was discussion in comments about if this is effective to call constructor many times in a loop. From your example new pluginMethods($this) will be called for each element .element? Or maybe I should use different plugin pattern for my case? – zitix Jun 12 '14 at 18:46
    
@zitix yes it is effective. The other answer was about the same but the object declaration (pluginMethods in this case) was inside the pluginName function, hence why the debate. Just know that .data() return only 1 value, the first one in the stack. That mean you need to loop your stack before doing your call to the function. – Karl-André Gagnon Jun 12 '14 at 18:56
    
@zitix here a the way you should init you plugin imo. I guess you can read code so it shouldn't be hard to understand : jsfiddle.net/mc3VT – Karl-André Gagnon Jun 12 '14 at 19:25
    
I have one last question. Can I add public methods directly inside function pluginMethods($el) (see greenFont() in this fiddle based on your example: jsfiddle.net/9UC5y)? I've checked and it works correctly but I'm wondering why you are using $.extend(pluginMethods.prototype, {...}); in your example to add public methods. Is it just for better code organization or is it required for some other reasons? – zitix Jun 14 '14 at 9:12
    
@zitix it is not required but it is an optimisation. If you have not using prototype, you can reassigning the function everytime you call your plugin. Declaring it as a prototype allow you to declare it 1 time and sharing among other object declaration. I also personally think using prototype is much cleaner. – Karl-André Gagnon Jun 16 '14 at 12:27

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