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I came accross this on the Mike Ash "Care and feeding of singletons" and was a little puzzeled by his comment:

This code is kind of slow, though. Taking a lock is somewhat expensive. Making it more painful is the fact that the vast majority of the time, the lock is pointless. The lock is only needed when foo is nil, which basically only happens once. After the singleton is initialized, the need for the lock is gone, but the lock itself remains.

+(id)sharedFoo {
    static Foo *foo = nil;
    @synchronized([Foo class]) {
        if(!foo) foo = [[self alloc] init];
    }
    return foo;
}

My question is, and there is no doubt a good reason for this but why can't you write (see below) to limit the lock to when foo is nil?

+(id)sharedFoo {
    static Foo *foo = nil;
    if(!foo) {
        @synchronized([Foo class]) {
            foo = [[self alloc] init];
        }
    }
    return foo;
}

cheers gary

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1  
Ah ok, so basically you need a check inside the @synchronize block? –  fuzzygoat Mar 10 '10 at 17:16
    
That’s the whole point of the @synchronized: Allow one thread at a time to make the check. –  Nikolai Ruhe Mar 10 '10 at 17:17
    
Try dispatch_once() instead: stackoverflow.com/q/5720029/290295 –  ctpenrose Dec 16 '11 at 20:41
    
Here are some benchmarks comparing @synchronized "singleton" implementations vs. dispatch_once() (dispatch_once wins handily) bjhomer.blogspot.com/2011/09/synchronized-vs-dispatchonce.html –  ctpenrose Dec 16 '11 at 21:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Because then the test is subject to a race condition. Two different threads might independently test that foo is nil, and then (sequentially) create separate instances. This can happen in your modified version when one thread performs the test while the other is still inside +[Foo alloc] or -[Foo init], but has not yet set foo.

By the way, I wouldn't do it that way at all. Check out the dispatch_once() function, which lets you guarantee that a block is only ever executed once during your app's lifetime (assuming you have GCD on the platform you're targeting).

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That’s of course true. But wouldn’t the best solution be to test twice (inside and outside of the @synchronized). Then there would be no race condition nor performance penalty. –  Nikolai Ruhe Mar 10 '10 at 17:09
1  
@Nikolai: tell me there's a performance penalty after you've run Shark. :-) –  user23743 Mar 10 '10 at 17:10
    
@Graham: There’s no doubt that performance is bad in the original version that always takes the lock. I had it in my code and I did run Shark ;). Also, Mike Ash pointed it out in his original blog post. –  Nikolai Ruhe Mar 10 '10 at 17:16
    
Hi Graham, at the moment I am developing for the iPhone, so I really just wanted to understand what was happening. –  fuzzygoat Mar 10 '10 at 17:19
    
@Nikolai: Mike doesn't always run Shark. But if performance is bad for you, how frequently are you accessing this singleton? Must be thousands of times a second or more to get any noticeable cost. –  user23743 Mar 10 '10 at 17:27

This is called the double checked locking "optimization". As documented everywhere this is not safe. Even if it's not defeated by a compiler optimization, it will be defeated the way memory works on modern machines, unless you use some kind of fence/barriers.

Mike Ash also shows the correct solution using volatile and OSMemoryBarrier();.

The issue is that when one thread executes foo = [[self alloc] init]; there is no guarantee that when an other thread sees foo != 0 all memory writes performed by init is visible too.

Also see DCL and C++ and DCL and java for more details.

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+1 Thanks for making this clear. Instruction reordering and out-of-order memory access are both concepts that most programmers are not aware of. –  Nikolai Ruhe Mar 11 '10 at 13:12
2  
dispatch_once is the real solution, just use that and quit hacking –  slf Aug 31 '11 at 17:07
    
I think slf has it. stackoverflow.com/q/5720029/290295 –  ctpenrose Dec 16 '11 at 20:40

In your version the check for !foo could be occurring on multiple threads at the same time, allowing two threads to jump into the alloc block, one waiting for the other to finish before allocating another instance.

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You can optimize by only taking the lock if foo==nil, but after that you need to test again (within the @synchronized) to guard against race conditions.

+ (id)sharedFoo {
    static Foo *foo = nil;
    if(!foo) {
        @synchronized([Foo class]) {
            if (!foo)  // test again, in case 2 threads doing this at once
                foo = [[self alloc] init];
        }
    }
    return foo;
}
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1  
See @mfazekas answer for why this is wrong. –  Nikolai Ruhe Mar 11 '10 at 13:10

Best way if you have grand cenral dispatch

+ (MySingleton*) instance {
 static dispatch_once_t _singletonPredicate;
 static MySingleton *_singleton = nil;

 dispatch_once(&_singletonPredicate, ^{
    _singleton = [[super allocWithZone:nil] init];
 });

 return _singleton
 }
+ (id) allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone {
  return [self instance];
 }
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