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for line in sys.stdin:
    line = re.sub('\$File\$', sys.stdin.name, line)

I have this code in my python script's main, I want to return the filename but this just returns <stdin>. Any Ideas??

Again this script is a git smudge script which should be writing the filename of the file being committed.. not the name of the python script. Which is why inspect.getfile() doesn't work here either.

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by dano, Lev Levitsky Jun 12 '14 at 18:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
    
that answer seems to be specific to linux.. i need it to work for all machines. –  desmond Jun 12 '14 at 16:58
    
git smudge/clean filters are passed the data of a blob on their standard input. If there is a file name it takes the form of .git/objects/17/b8361bab1a69cbaa360eafb72e57b53bb72e04, which is not likely to be useful to you. But it's probably even more likely to be data being extracted/constructed on the fly from various pack files and deltas, in which case there isn't a real file name anyway. What are you really trying to do? –  twalberg Jun 12 '14 at 17:38
    
I have a bunch of files with scm headers that were created by svn. I want to switch my version control over to git so that when i commit those headers change along with the commit.. ///$File$ //$Date$ //$Branch$ //$Revision$ –  desmond Jun 13 '14 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

Maybe you could try using __name__ or os.path.realpath(__file__):

If you are importing the file:

print __name__

If you are running in the file:

print os.path.realpath(__file__)

Or, using sys:

print sys.argv[0]
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these are only printing out the name and location of my python script, not the files that I committed. –  desmond Jun 12 '14 at 16:55

Another alternative is to use inspect module:

echo "import inspect; print inspect.stack()[0][1]" > /tmp/foo.py
python /tmp/foo.py
/tmp/foo.py
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