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I've been trying to write a piece of test code which will continually print "Running" until a key is pressed. I've tried to implement this by creating an additional thread (called thread1) that will listen for a keypress.

When I run my code, the thread launches fine, and seems to execute properly until getch.getch() is called. While getch.getch() is waiting for a keypress, it seems to stop not only thread1, but also the main thread.

How can I ensure that while thread1 listens for a keypress, the main thread keeps running?

I'm using python 2.7 and getch 1.0 (https://pypi.python.org/pypi/getch).

Here's my code:

import threading
import time
import getch

class myThread (threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, threadID, name, cont):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.threadID = threadID
        self.name = name
        self.cont = cont

    def run(self):
        print "Starting " + self.name +"\n"
        print "waiting 2 seconds"
        time.sleep(2)
        char = getch.getch()
        print 'You pressed %s' % char
        cont.append(1)
        print "Terminating" + self.name

cont = []

thread1 = myThread(1, "Thread1", cont)

thread1.start()

while cont == []:
    print "Running"
    time.sleep(0.5)

It outputs this:

Starting Thread1
Running

waiting 2 seconds
Running
Running
Running

And it stays there until I press a key

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're hitting this issue because of the GIL. It works fine if you make the threading.Thread a multiprocessing.Process:

class myThread (multiprocessing.Process):
    def __init__(self, threadID, name, cont):
        super(myThread, self).__init__()
        #threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.threadID = threadID
        self.name = name
        self.cont = contdef run(self):
        print "Starting " + self.name +"\n"
        char = getch.getch()
        print 'You pressed %s' % char
        cont.append(1)
        print "Terminating" + self.name

cont = []

thread1 = myThread(1, "Thread1", cont)

thread1.start()

while cont == []: 
    print "Running"
    time.sleep(0.5)

Output:

dan@dantop:~$ ./get.py 
Running
Starting Thread1

Running
Running
Running
Running
Running
Running
Running
Running
You pressed f
TerminatingThread1
Running
Running
Running
Running
Running
Running
Running
Running

getch is a C-extension, and is doing a blocking call to getchar(), but it doesn't release the GIL first. Because Python cannot actually run two threads concurrently, it gets stuck in the worker thread waiting for blocking call to getchar().

You can actually fix this bug pretty easily, by explicitly releasing the GIL from the getch C-extension code, using Py_BEGIN_THREADS and Py_ALLOW_THREADS:

static PyObject *getch_getche(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
    int ok = PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "");
    char c;
    Py_BEGIN_ALLOW_THREADS
    c = getche();
    Py_END_ALLOW_THREADS
    return PyUnicode_FromFormat("%c", c); 
}

static PyObject *getch_getch(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
    int ok = PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "");
    char c;
    Py_BEGIN_ALLOW_THREADS
    c = getch();
    Py_END_ALLOW_THREADS
    return PyUnicode_FromFormat("%c", c); 
}

If you make that change to getchmodule.c and rebuild the extension, the original, thread-using, example code works fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Its probably hitting the gil because getch is a blocking system level call not a blocking python call ... raw_input is a python call that blocks(but its a python level call) and works fine but i think getch blocks from an os level rather than python – Joran Beasley Jun 12 '14 at 19:32
    
Perfect! That did the trick. Although it's not breaking the loop as it should, but that's a separate issue. Thank You! – user3735129 Jun 12 '14 at 19:37
    
@JoranBeasley yes, that's correct. It's blocking in a C-extension without releasing the GIL. I updated my answer to explain that and how to fix it if desired. – dano Jun 12 '14 at 19:40

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