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Is there a better shorter way than iterating over the array?

int[] arr = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };
int sum = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
{
    sum += arr[i];
}

clarification:

Better primary means cleaner code but hints on performance improvement are also welcome. (Like already mentioned: splitting large arrays).


It's not like I was looking for killer performance improvement - I just wondered if this very kind of syntactic sugar wasn't already available: "There's String.Join - what the heck about int[]?".

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2  
Better in what way? Faster? Less written code? –  Fredrik Mörk Mar 10 '10 at 18:13
3  
People are so weird these days. "If there is not already a function for something, it is wrong". How much more simple can you get; iterate over the array, add them together. Yeesh. –  Ed S. Mar 10 '10 at 18:30
1  
Also, LOL at "cleaner code". What do you think the library's Array.Sum is doing when you call it? –  Ed S. Mar 10 '10 at 18:30
3  
@Ed: I'm not that daft to think that the less code i write, the faster it runs. But less code is more readable for sure and cleaner in that way. –  Filburt Mar 10 '10 at 22:00
2  
What's the matter folks? 3 hrs and still no exhaustive performance measurements comparing .Sum() vs. for() vs. foreach()? –  Filburt Mar 10 '10 at 22:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Provided that you can use C# 3.5 and LINQ, try

int sum = arr.Sum();
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Thanks a lot - i assume you deserve the marker in this heartbeat finish. Especially for pointing out the C# 3.5 requirement. –  Filburt Mar 10 '10 at 18:16
1  
@Filburt / @Thomas: a minor correction: it's C# 3.0. The .NET version that provides the Sum extension method is version 3.5. –  Ahmad Mageed Mar 10 '10 at 18:20
4  
The identity lambda isn't necessary. Except to confuse the new guy on the team. –  Will Mar 10 '10 at 18:23

Yes there is. With .NET 3.5:

int sum = arr.Sum();
Console.WriteLine(sum);

If you're not using .NET 3.5 you could do this:

int sum = 0;
Array.ForEach(arr, delegate(int i) { sum += i; });
Console.WriteLine(sum);
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5  
+1 for the non-LINQ answer. –  Michael Itzoe Mar 10 '10 at 18:12
1  
Why such a convoluted pre 3.5 version? The foreach loop is available in all versions of C#. –  Jørn Schou-Rode Mar 16 '10 at 9:37
    
@Jørn: the OP asked for a shorter approach. A foreach just substitutes one line of code for another and isn't shorter. Apart from that a foreach is perfectly fine and is more readable. –  Ahmad Mageed Mar 16 '10 at 11:34
2  
Point taken. Yet, the following saves 18 chars compared to your sample: foreach (int i in arr) sum += i; –  Jørn Schou-Rode Mar 16 '10 at 11:44

With LINQ:

arr.Sum()
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It depends on how you define better. If you want the code to look cleaner, you can use .Sum() as mentioned in other answers. If you want the operation to run quickly and you have a large array, you can make it parallel by breaking it into sub sums and then sum the results.

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+1 Very good point on performance improvement but honestly my initial wish was to get rid off the iteration. –  Filburt Mar 10 '10 at 18:21
    
(nobody tell Fil that he just pushed the iteration a couple levels down the stack) –  Will Mar 10 '10 at 18:24
    
@Will: Dude - don't expect me to believe if i don't write the code magic will happen ;-) –  Filburt Mar 10 '10 at 18:27
1  
I suspect it would have to be a VERY large array before such a parallel optimization would make sense. –  Ian Mercer Mar 10 '10 at 18:28
    
Yeah, since when did a for loop become bad practice? –  Ed S. Mar 10 '10 at 18:31

Using foreach would be shorter code, but probably do exactly the same steps at runtime after JIT optimization recognizes the comparison to Length in the for-loop controlling expression.

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    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int temp = 0;
        int[] no = new int[10];
        Console.WriteLine("Enter the 10 numbers");

        for (int s = 0; s < 9; s++)
        {
            no[s] = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

            temp += no[s];
        }

        Console.WriteLine("sum of 10 number is : {0}", temp );
        Console.ReadLine();

    }
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its the basic coding for the C# beginners who were able to easily understand it. –  sudharsan 16 hours ago
    
I don't quite understand how repeating the approach of my question is a useful answer. Back when I posted this question I simply wasn't aware of the according Linq Extension Method .Sum(). –  Filburt 14 hours ago

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