Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

according to Apple's document, the app's vendor ID is calculated based on bundle ID, and from my understanding, it doesn't related to a device's UUID in any way, which means nobody can tell the device from the vendor ID alone.

I am planning to upload the vendor IDs from my app to my server to help me keep track of my users. So, I would like to know: is it OK to upload and store them in plaintext?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The identifierForVendor in itself is not sensitive data but if you are effectively using it as a password (actually a username and password all in one), then it becomes sensitive data because of what it represents and what somebody can do with it if they happened to compromise your database. In your case, it seems it would be the equivalent of storing passwords in plaintext, which is generally not a good idea.

Another thing to consider while not exactly related to your question is actually how and when this ID is generated. It will not work as a permanent identifier since it only remains the same for a given device for a given vendor as long as at least one app from that vendor remains on that device. Basically, if a user installs your app, then reinstalls it (and they don't have any other apps from you on their device at that time), the ID you get will actually be different, and they will be considered a different "user". Because of this, it is not a great idea to try to use this identifier as a permanent login mechanism.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer. My apps merely use vendor ID to keep track of users' anonymous usage records and feedbacks, so based on your answer, I think is safe to transfer the vendor IDs in plaintext. –  Craig Zheng Jun 13 at 4:37
    
Yep, in that case it sounds totally fine! –  Dima Jun 13 at 18:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.