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I am working on a program in C and using the SDCC compiler for a 8051 architecture device. I am trying to write a function called GetName that will read 8 characters from Flash Memory and return the character array in some form. I know that it is not possible to return an array in C so I am trying to do it using a struct like this:

//********************FLASH.h file*******************************
MyStruct GetName(int i);  //Function prototype

#define NAME_SIZE  8

typedef struct
{
    char Name[NAME_SIZE];
} MyStruct;

extern MyStruct GetName(int i);


// *****************FLASH.c file***********************************
#include "FLASH.h"

MyStruct GetName( int i)
{
     MyStruct newNameStruct;

     //...
     // Fill the array by reading data from Flash 
     //...

     return newNameStruct;
}

I don't have any references to this function yet but for some reason, I get a compiler error that says "Function cannot return aggregate." Does this mean that my compiler does not support functions that return structs? Or am I just doing something wrong?

share|improve this question
    
C compilers have been returning structure by value since the language was invented. Your problem is what KennyTM said. –  anon Mar 10 '10 at 19:15
    
The function prototype needs to come BEFORE the function call! –  anon Mar 10 '10 at 19:18
    
@Jordan: Put the function prototype before the main, not after it. –  KennyTM Mar 10 '10 at 19:18
    
I have made all of these corrections, still no luck. –  PICyourBrain Mar 10 '10 at 19:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

SDCC doesn't support assignment and returning structs yet (if their Wiki is up-to-date):

Not yet implemented in sdcc:

  • Data type double.
  • Structures and unions can not be assigned, passed as function parameters or return values.
  • register storage class specifier in function parameters.

Maybe you should make a

void GetName(MyStruct* ret_name, int i);

function instead.


That said, you should put the function prototype before the main and after the MyStruct. If there's no prototypes a function will be assumed to return int.

MyStruct GetName(int i);
void main(void) { ...

(Also, the main function should be an int main(void) or int main(int argc, char** argv). It shouldn't return void.)

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I didn't mention it but I do have a prototype that matches what I have above... –  PICyourBrain Mar 10 '10 at 19:13
    
@Jordan: Please show the complete code then. –  KennyTM Mar 10 '10 at 19:14
    
I'm using the SDCC compiler –  PICyourBrain Mar 10 '10 at 19:15
1  
That still can't be the proper complete code, since the definition of MyStruct appears after the prototype, which would not compile. Order matters here. Show us exactly what you are trying to compile. –  Tyler McHenry Mar 10 '10 at 19:27
1  
+1 for passing in a pointer to the structure instead of returning a huge struct. –  cschol Mar 19 '10 at 13:02

All post-ANSI C89/90 compilers allow returning struct objects. Classic (pedantic) K&R C compilers do not.

However, in any case you have to declare the function first. i.e. before you call it. And char[8] Name inside your struct is not a valid declaration. The valid form is char Name[8].

Your pointer-to-array-returning function is declared correctly. It is your size macro that's broken. Should be

#define NAME_SIZE 8 

Note: no = character.

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Sorry, you are wrong. K&R compilers, at least all the ones I've ever used, return structures by value. –  anon Mar 10 '10 at 19:16
    
Ok, I changed it to char Name[8] and still no luck... –  PICyourBrain Mar 10 '10 at 19:18
1  
@Neil Butterworth: Whatever you used, implemented struct assignment as an extension. The "canonical" K&R C does not allow struct assigment and struct-passing/returning by value. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_(programming_language)#K.26R_C –  AndreyT Mar 10 '10 at 19:19
    
@AndreyT A reference, please. –  anon Mar 10 '10 at 19:20
    
@Neil Butterworth: I hope this will do en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_(programming_language)#K.26R_C (see at the end of the section) –  AndreyT Mar 10 '10 at 19:21

Yes, functions can return structs in C. Your code above has several errors. With a few changes, It compiles correctly under gcc (I don't have sdcc installed to try with, but please try the code below.

 struct MyStruct
 {
   char Name[8];
 }; 

 struct MyStruct GetName( int i)
 {
      struct MyStruct newNameStruct;

      //...
      // Fill the array by reading data from Flash 
      //...
     return newNameStruct;
 } 


 int main(void)
 {
     int NameIndex = 3;
     struct MyStruct testStruct;
     testStruct = GetName(NameIndex);
     return 0;  
 }
share|improve this answer

I really wouldn't want to use a C compiler that didn't implement structure call and return by value, as KennyMT suggests yours doesn't. In fact, such a compiler should not really be called a C compiler. If the compiler implements structures at all, return by value is not hard to implement.

Anyway, to work with your compiler you will want something like:

typedef struct
{
    char Name[NAME_SIZE];
} MyStruct;

void f( MyStruct * m ) {
   strcpy( m->Name, "foo" );
}

int main() {
    MyStruct ms;
    f( & ms );
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK, I tried this and now I get a linker error saying that "?ASlink-Error-Could not get 29 consecutive bytes in internal RAM for area DSEG" What is DESG? –  PICyourBrain Mar 10 '10 at 20:16
    
@Jordan I think maybe the time has come to sit down and read your compiler and linker's manual. The hardware & software you are using would appear to be so far from being standard that asking further questions here may not get you very far, –  anon Mar 10 '10 at 20:32
    
probably right... –  PICyourBrain Mar 11 '10 at 15:46

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