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Is there any reflection/introspection/magic in PHP that will let you find the PHP file where a particular class (or function) was defined?

In other words, I have the name of a PHP class, or an instantiated object. I want to pass this to something (function, Reflection class, etc.) that would return the file system path where the class was defined.

/path/to/class/definition.php

I realize I could use (get_included_files()) to get a list of all the files that have been included so far and then parse them all manually, but that's a lot of file system access for a single attempt.

I also realize I could write some additional code in our __autoload mechanism that caches this information somewhere. However, modifying the existing __autoload is off limits in the situation I have in mind.

Hearing about extensions that can do this would be interesting, but I'd ultimately like something that can run on a "stock" install.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 87 down vote accepted

Try

Example:

class Foo {}
$reflector = new ReflectionClass('Foo');
echo $reflector->getFileName();

This will return false when the filename cannot be found, e.g. on native classes.

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if you had an includes folder, you could run a shell script command to "grep" for "class $className" by doing: $filename = `grep -r "class $className" $includesFolder/*` and it would return which file it was in. Other than that, i don't think there is any magic function for PHP to do it for ya.

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5  
wow, i completely missed @Gordon's answer, heh...much better than mine... –  Seaux Mar 10 '10 at 20:01
2  
Honest, non-asshole curiosity here. What made you think this answer was any better than the idea I'd already considered and rejected? " I realize I could use (get_included_files()) to get a list of all the files that have been included so far and then parse them all manually, but that's a lot of file system access for a single attempt." –  Alan Storm Mar 10 '10 at 20:22
    
because its one line as opposed to however many lines it'd take to write a parser in PHP and the grep function is compiled C, i think, and likely much faster than whatever would have been written. –  Seaux Mar 10 '10 at 20:28
    
Ah, got it. My actual concern was repeated disk access to each of the files over and over again to do this (it's something that will happen a lot in the tool I'm building) and not the amount of code I'll try to make that clearer next time. (FYI: You should look into ack. It's way better than grep!) –  Alan Storm Mar 10 '10 at 21:26
    
ack or awk? I love awk, its actually my fav programming language, but more people use grep regularly...its "cleaner" for stuff this simple –  Seaux Mar 10 '10 at 21:32

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