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Something I find myself doing more and more is checking a string for empty (as in "" or null) and a conditional operator.

A current example:

s.SiteNumber.IsNullOrEmpty() ? "No Number" : s.SiteNumber;

This is just an extension method, it's equivalent to:

string.IsNullOrEmpty(s.SiteNumber) ? "No Number" : s.SiteNumber;

Since it's empty and not null, ?? won't do the trick. A string.IsNullOrEmpty() version of ?? would be the perfect solution. I'm thinking there has to be a cleaner way of doing this (I hope!), but I've been at a loss to find it.

Does anyone know of a better way to do this, even if it's only in .Net 4.0?

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2  
Just to tantalize you a bit, you can easily define custom, ad-hoc binary (and unary, for that matter) operators in F#. Here let (|?) x y = if String.IsNullOrEmpty(x) then y else x and use it like s.SiteNumber |? "No Number". –  Stephen Swensen Apr 1 '12 at 0:49
    
I hope you don't mind the edit. –  gdoron Jun 20 '12 at 8:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 44 down vote accepted

There isn't a built-in way to do this. You could make your extension method return a string or null, however, which would allow the coalescing operator to work. This would be odd, however, and I personally prefer your current approach.

Since you're already using an extension method, why not just make one that returns the value or a default:

string result = s.SiteNumber.ConvertNullOrEmptyTo("No Number");
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5  
I think you're right, and this is the cleanest solution currently available that's still readable. I'd love something like a ??? operator in C# 5 though, who knows. –  Nick Craver Mar 10 '10 at 21:01
2  
and what would the ??? operator do? take default values in addition to nulls? sounds extremely complicated at best –  Nico Jul 25 '11 at 0:09
    
With lambda expressions maybe? For instance: assume "item" is nullable, then... item ?? x=> x.ToString() : null; –  Isaac Llopis Mar 6 at 11:04

C# already lets us substitute values for null with ??. So all we need is an extension that converts an empty string to null, and then we use it like this:

s.SiteNumber.NullIfEmpty() ?? "No Number";
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?? without : would be sufficient. guess that's a typo? –  devio Mar 10 '10 at 20:27
    
Typo, thanks :) –  RedFilter Mar 10 '10 at 20:31

I know this is an old question - but I was looking for an answer and none of the above fit my need as well as what I ended up using:

private static string Coalesce(params string[] strings)
{
    return strings.FirstOrDefault(s => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(s));
}

Usage:

string result = Coalesce(s.SiteNumber, s.AltSiteNumber, "No Number");
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I like, but had to fix a compiler error and made it a bit more compact. –  gregmac Jul 15 at 22:10

I have a couple of utility extensions that I like to use:

public static string OrDefault(this string str, string @default = default(string))
{
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) ? @default : str;
}

public static object OrDefault(this string str, object @default)
{
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) ? @default : str;
}

Edit: Inspired by sfsr's answer, I'll be adding this variant to my toolbox from now on:

public static string Coalesce(this string str, params string[] strings)
{
    return (new[] {str})
        .Concat(strings)
        .FirstOrDefault(s => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(s));
}
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I'm definitely using the "Coalesce" term, as it more closely resembles the intent of the null coalescing operator (??), though I changed it to "CoalesceTo." –  llaughlin May 31 '12 at 21:10

A slightly faster extension method than proposed earlier perhaps:

public static string Fallback(this string @this, string @default = "")
{
    return (@this == null || @this.Trim().Length == 0) ? @default : @this;
}
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7  
Why not make use of IsNullOrWhitespace rather than trim and length it. –  weston Dec 19 '12 at 15:11

how about a string extension method ValueOrDefault()

public static string ValueOrDefault(this string s, string sDefault)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        return sDefault;
    return s;
}

or return null if string is Empty:

public static string Value(this string s)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        return null;
    return s;
}

Didn't try these solutions though.

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2  
I like option #1 there, although I'd call it something more semantic like Or(), so I could write "string s = s.SiteNumber.Or("Default");" –  jvenema Apr 29 '11 at 19:25
2  
Calling something ...OrDefault() would be confusing if it didn't behave like the rest of the framework's ...OrDefault() methods. Like it or not, MS has given a specific meaning to that naming and deviating from that behavior in custom methods is unnecessarily confusing to users of your API. –  mattmc3 Jul 9 '11 at 23:12

I'm using a string Coalesce extension method of my own. Since those here are using LINQ, and absolutelly wasting resources for time intensive operations (I'm using it in tight loops), I'll share mine:

public static class StringCoalesceExtension
{
    public static string Coalesce(this string s1, string s2)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s1) ? s2 : s1;
    }
}

I think it is quite simple, and you don't even need to bother with null string values. Use it like this:

string s1 = null;
string s2 = "";
string s3 = "loudenvier";
string s = s1.Coalesce(s2.Coalesce(s3));
Assert.AreEqual("loudenvier", s);

I use it a lot. One of those "utility" functions you can't live without after first using it :-)

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I like the brevity of the following extension method QQQ for this, though of course an operator like? would be better. But we can 1 up this by allowing not just two but three string option values to be compared, which one encounters the need to handle every now and then (see second function below).

#region QQ

[DebuggerStepThrough]
public static string QQQ(this string str, string value2)
{
    return (str != null && str.Length > 0)
        ? str
        : value2;
}

[DebuggerStepThrough]
public static string QQQ(this string str, string value2, string value3)
{
    return (str != null && str.Length > 0)
        ? str
        : (value2 != null && value2.Length > 0)
            ? value2
            : value3;
}


// Following is only two QQ, just checks null, but allows more than 1 string unlike ?? can do:

[DebuggerStepThrough]
public static string QQ(this string str, string value2, string value3)
{
    return (str != null)
        ? str
        : (value2 != null)
            ? value2
            : value3;
}

#endregion
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