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I am trying to implement functionality in a way that it was specified here:

Specific solution

However, I'm trying to do it as generic method to be used as an extension:

    public static TEnum? Merge<TEnum>(this IEnumerable<TEnum> values)
        where TEnum : struct, IConvertible, IComparable, IFormattable
    {
        Nullable<TEnum> merged = null;
        if (values == null || values.Count() == 0)
            return null;

        foreach(TEnum value in values)
        {
            if (merged == null)
                merged = value;
            else
            {
                merged = merged | value;
            }
        }
        return merged;
    }

Problem is however that this line:

merged = merged | value;

Will not compile. Message I'm getting is:

Operator '|' cannot be applied to operands of type 'TEnum?' and 'TEnum'.

Is it possible to write this generic method that will convert array of enum values to flags enum?

share|improve this question
    
Why would you need to return TEnum? here? A [Flags] enum should always have a 0/None value - wouldn't you just return that? – Marc Gravell Jun 13 '14 at 11:08
1  
Aside: doing a Count() on the sequence means you are iterating it twice - that is not a good idea - it could be expensive, but is not even guaranteed to work – Marc Gravell Jun 13 '14 at 11:09
    
There's no simple way of doing this that doesn't involve boxing; would complicated approaches suffice? – Marc Gravell Jun 13 '14 at 11:12
    
I am trying to merge array of enum values into one enum value that is made of those values, under condition that TEnum is enum marked with [FlagsEnum]. Do I make any sense here? :) Check the link on other stackoverflow thread, I'm trying to accomplish the same in a generic way. – Admir Tuzović Jun 13 '14 at 11:13
    
The problem is once you enter the domain of generics, the behaviour of Enum is effectively lost therefore you can't simply OR the values. – James Jun 13 '14 at 11:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a couple of issues here, but the biggest is that generics does not support operators - and | is an operator. You can hack around it via object, but then you have boxing. Here's what I would do - it generates some dynamic IL per-enum-type (once only), and uses that to do a direct "or" without boxing. Note that it also uses 0 for the default return (far more expected, IMO), and avoids an explicit Count(), as that can be unpredictably expensive, and can break the enumerator (you can't guarantee that you can enumerate data more than once):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection.Emit;

public static class EnumUtils
{
    public static TEnum Merge<TEnum>(this IEnumerable<TEnum> values)
        where TEnum : struct
    {
        TEnum merged = default(TEnum);
        if (values != null)
        {
            var or = Operator<TEnum>.Or;
            foreach (var value in values)
            {
                merged = or(merged, value);
            }
        }
        return (TEnum)(object)merged;
    }
    static class Operator<T>
    {
        public static readonly Func<T, T, T> Or;

        static Operator()
        {
            var dn = new DynamicMethod("or", typeof(T),
                new[] { typeof(T), typeof(T) }, typeof(EnumUtils));
            var il = dn.GetILGenerator();
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_1);
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Or);
            il.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
            Or = (Func<T, T, T>)dn.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<T, T, T>));
        }

    }
}
static class Program {

    [Flags]
    public enum Foo
    {
        None = 0, A = 1,  B =2, C = 4
    }
    static unsafe void Main()
    {
        var merged = EnumUtils.Merge(new[] { Foo.A, Foo.C });

    }
}

Edit: if you really must return null for the "null or empty" case, then you could use the following tweak - but I emphasize: IMO this is an incorrect implementation - it would be more correct to simply return 0 (aka default(TEnum)) for this scenario.

public static TEnum? Merge<TEnum>(this IEnumerable<TEnum> values)
    where TEnum : struct
{
    if (values == null) return null;
    using (var iter = values.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!iter.MoveNext()) return null;
        TEnum merged = iter.Current;
        var or = Operator<TEnum>.Or;
        while(iter.MoveNext())
        {
            merged = or(merged, iter.Current);
        }
        return merged;
    }
}

What this does is:

  • check for a null sequence, short-circuit
  • obtain the sequence iterator, and try to read a value - short-circuit if none
  • use the current (first) value as our seed, and obtain the operator
  • iterate the sequence, applying the operator successively
  • return the combined value
share|improve this answer
    
Can you just adjust method to return TEnum? Defalt(TEnum) is not really working for me. Apart from that, I'm new to DynamicMethod concept, so it will take me some time to understand what you just did :) – Admir Tuzović Jun 13 '14 at 11:34
1  
default(TEnum), with a small d, is a reserved C# keyword - that should work fine, even for generics. What I did was use the fact that static constructors are only evaluated once, hence the static constructor for Operator<T> is executed once per unique T. So inside the static constructor, we create a runtime method that declares 2 parameters, reads them onto the stack, applies "or" (fortunately, an IL operator exists), and returns the value - and store a typed delegate to that method in the Or field. Then in our Merge method, we obtain that delegate and execute it per item. – Marc Gravell Jun 13 '14 at 11:37
    
@BarisaPuter to be clear: default(TEnum) is really just a way of saying "zero out enough memory for a TEnum, and give me the value" - which is, as it happens, exactly what we want for an enum value without any flags set. – Marc Gravell Jun 13 '14 at 11:39
    
Sorry, I've made a typo :) I'm familiar with default(TEnum), I'm just trying to have method that will build a valid enum value from flags, or just return null instead if i.e. values collection supplied as input is null or empty collection. – Admir Tuzović Jun 13 '14 at 11:51
    
@BarisaPuter frankly, I think the "else return null" is a bad and confusing idea, but I'll add an edit to show that – Marc Gravell Jun 13 '14 at 11:55

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