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As far as I understood the "static initialization block" is used to set values of static field if it cannot be done in one line.

But I do not understand why we need a special block for that. For example we declare a field as static (without a value assignment). And then write several lines of the code which generate and assign a value to the above declared static field.

Why do we need this lines in a special block like: static {...}?

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3  
Minor feedback, but it would help if you could please state your assumptions clearly, and hence clarify which answer is correct. when i first read your question, i mis-understood and thought you knew the difference between {...} vs static {...}. (in which case Jon Skeet definitely answered your question way better) – David T. Dec 15 '13 at 22:52

11 Answers 11

up vote 227 down vote accepted

The non-static block:

{
    // Do Something...
}

Gets called every time an instance of the class is constructed. The static block only gets called once, when the class itself is initialized, no matter how many objects of that type you create.

Example:

public class Test {

    static{
        System.out.println("Static");
    }

    {
        System.out.println("Non-static block");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test t = new Test();
        Test t2 = new Test();
    }
}

This prints:

Static
Non-static block
Non-static block
share|improve this answer
60  
Why is this the accepted answer? It doesn't even answer the question. – Paul Bellora Sep 30 '11 at 0:17
27  
It answers the question: "This gets called everytime the class is constructed. The static block only gets called once, no matter how many objects of that type you create." – Adam Arold Apr 5 '12 at 11:32
48  
For the curious reader, the non-static block is actually copied by the Java compiler into every constructor the class has (source). So it is still the constructor's job to initialize fields. – Martin Andersson Apr 1 '13 at 18:56
1  
The accepted answer should be this one : stackoverflow.com/a/2420404/363573. This answer presents a real life example where you need static blocks. – Stephan Oct 28 '13 at 17:38
8  
Why is this answer suddenly getting downvoted? You might disagree about this being the accepted answer, but it is certainly not in any way wrong or misleading. It is simply trying to help the understanding of these language constructs with a simple example. – Frederik Wordenskjold Dec 1 '13 at 18:50

If they weren't in a static initialization block, where would they be? How would you declare a variable which was only meant to be local for the purposes of initialization, and distinguish it from a field? For example, how would you want to write:

public class Foo {
    private static final int widgets;

    static {
        int first = Widgets.getFirstCount();
        int second = Widgets.getSecondCount();
        // Imagine more complex logic here which really used first/second
        widgets = first + second;
    }
}

If first and second weren't in a block, they'd look like fields. If they were in a block without static in front of it, that would count as an instance initialization block instead of a static initialization block, so it would be executed once per constructed instance rather than once in total.

Now in this particular case, you could use a static method instead:

public class Foo {
    private static final int widgets = getWidgets();

    static int getWidgets() {
        int first = Widgets.getFirstCount();
        int second = Widgets.getSecondCount();
        // Imagine more complex logic here which really used first/second
        return first + second;
    }
}

... but that doesn't work when there are multiple variables you wish to assign within the same block, or none (e.g. if you just want to log something - or maybe initialize a native library).

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1  
Does the static block happen before static variables are assigned or after? private static int widgets = 0; static{widgets = 2;} – Weishi Zeng Sep 5 '14 at 0:52
1  
Was curious about if the static block happen before static variables are assigned or after. e.g. private static int widgets = 0; static{widgets = 2;} Found out that the '=' assignment happens in order, which means the '=' put first will be assigned first. The above example will give 'widgets' a value of 2. (P.S. didn't know that comments can only be edited in 5 min...) – Weishi Zeng Sep 5 '14 at 1:02
    
@WeishiZeng: Yes, this is as documented in docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/html/… - point 9. – Jon Skeet Sep 5 '14 at 5:44
    
But couldn't you also use a private static method that has the exact same code as the the static initialization block and assign widgets to the private static method? – Zachary Kraus Jun 9 '15 at 22:18
1  
@Zachary: Do you mean returning the value, and assigning the result of the method call? If so, yes - when you are assigning to exactly one variable as a result of the block. Will edit my answer with details in about 7 hours... – Jon Skeet Jun 9 '15 at 23:24

Here's an example:

  private static final HashMap<String, String> MAP = new HashMap<String, String>();
  static {
    MAP.put("banana", "honey");
    MAP.put("peanut butter", "jelly");
    MAP.put("rice", "beans");
  }

The code in the "static" section(s) will be executed at class load time, before any instances of the class are constructed (and before any static methods are called from elsewhere). That way you can make sure that the class resources are all ready to use.

It's also possible to have non-static initializer blocks. Those act like extensions to the set of constructor methods defined for the class. They look just like static initializer blocks, except the keyword "static" is left off.

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3  
For that particular example sometimes the double brace pattern is been "abused" :) – BalusC Mar 10 '10 at 21:25
    
It can be abused, but on the other hand it does clean up some messes, and makes some kinds of code a little more "solid." I program in Erlang for fun, and you get hooked on not needing local variables :-) – Pointy Mar 10 '10 at 21:47
1  
<< The code in the "static" section(s) will be executed at class load time, before any instances of the class are constructed (and before any static methods are called from elsewhere). That way you can make sure that the class resources are all ready to use. >> (Which "Pointy" mentioned in above answer) this is very important point to be noted when it comes to static block execution. – learner Jun 9 '10 at 6:16
    
@learner not so for Enum types. – YoYo Jun 15 '15 at 18:44

It's also useful when you actually don't want to assign the value to anything, such as loading some class only once during runtime.

E.g.

static {
    try {
        Class.forName("com.example.jdbc.Driver");
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        throw new ExceptionInInitializerError("Cannot load JDBC driver.", e);
    }
}

Hey, there's another benefit, you can use it to handle exceptions. Imagine that getStuff() here throws an Exception which really belongs in a catch block:

private static Object stuff = getStuff(); // Won't compile: unhandled exception.

then a static initializer is useful here. You can handle the exception there.

Another example is to do stuff afterwards which can't be done during assigning:

private static Properties config = new Properties();

static {
    try { 
        config.load(Thread.currentThread().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("config.properties");
    } catch (IOException e) {
        throw new ExceptionInInitializerError("Cannot load properties file.", e);
    }
}

To come back to the JDBC driver example, any decent JDBC driver itself also makes use of the static initializer to register itself in the DriverManager. Also see this and this answer.

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5  
+1 for the exception handling bit – Paul Bellora Sep 30 '11 at 0:20
1  
Herein lies dangerous voodoo... static initializers are run in the synthetic clinit() method, which is implicitly synchronized. This means that the JVM will acquire a lock on the classfile in question. This can lead to deadlock in multithreaded environments if two classes try to load each other, and each one starts loading in a different thread. See www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg1IV48872 – Ajax Jun 18 '15 at 3:07
    
@Ajax: I'd consider this a bug in either the JDBC driver in question, or in the application code responsible for loading it. Usually, in case of decent JDBC drivers, as long as you load it only once applicationwide during application's startup, there's nothing at matter. – BalusC Jan 11 at 18:24
    
It certainly would be a bug but not entirely the fault of the JDBC driver, however. Maybe the driver innocently has its own static initializers, and maybe you innocently initialize this class along with some others in your app, and, oh no, some unexpected classes cyclically load each other, and now your app deadlocks. I discovered this thanks to deadlock between java.awt.AWTEvent and sun.util.logging.PlatformLogger. I only touched AWTEvent to tell it to run headless, and some other lib wound up loading PlatformLogger... which AWTEvent also loads. – Ajax Jan 12 at 14:41
    
Both classes wound up synchronized on different threads, and my build deadlocked about 1/150 runs. So, I am now a lot more careful on classloading in static blocks. In the case I mentioned above, using a deferred provider pattern where I could create an interim provider class immediately (with no chance of deadlock), initialize the field, and then when it is actually accessed (in a non-synchronized field access), then I actually load the classes that can cause the deadlock. – Ajax Jan 12 at 14:45

There are a few actual reasons that it is required to exist:

  1. initializing static final members whose initialization might throw an exception
  2. initializing static final members with calculated values

People tend to use static {} blocks as a convenient way to initialize things that the class depends on within the runtime as well - such as ensuring that particular class is loaded (e.g., JDBC drivers). That can be done in other ways; however, the two things that I mention above can only be done with a construct like the static {} block.

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You can execute bits of code once for a class before an object is constructed in the static blocks.

E.g.

class A {
  static int var1 = 6;
  static int var2 = 9;
  static int var3;
  static long var4;

  static Date date1;
  static Date date2;

  static {
    date1 = new Date();

    for(int cnt = 0; cnt < var2; cnt++){
      var3 += var1;
    }

    System.out.println("End first static init: " + new Date());
  }
}
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I would say static block is just syntactic sugar. There is nothing you could do with static block and not with anything else.

To re-use some examples posted here.

This piece of code could be re-written without using static initialiser.

Method #1: With static

private static final HashMap<String, String> MAP;
static {
    MAP.put("banana", "honey");
    MAP.put("peanut butter", "jelly");
    MAP.put("rice", "beans");
  }

Method #2: Without static

private static final HashMap<String, String> MAP = getMap();
private static HashMap<String, String> getMap()
{
    HashMap<String, String> ret = new HashMap<>();
    ret.put("banana", "honey");
    ret.put("peanut butter", "jelly");
    ret.put("rice", "beans");
    return ret;
}
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It is a common misconception to think that a static block has only access to static fields. For this I would like to show below piece of code that I quite often use in real-life projects (copied partially from another answer in a slightly different context):

public enum Language { 
  ENGLISH("eng", "en", "en_GB", "en_US"),   
  GERMAN("de", "ge"),   
  CROATIAN("hr", "cro"),   
  RUSSIAN("ru"),
  BELGIAN("be",";-)");

  static final private Map<String,Language> ALIAS_MAP = new HashMap<String,Language>(); 
  static { 
    for (Language l:Language.values()) { 
      // ignoring the case by normalizing to uppercase
      ALIAS_MAP.put(l.name().toUpperCase(),l); 
      for (String alias:l.aliases) ALIAS_MAP.put(alias.toUpperCase(),l); 
    } 
  } 

  static public boolean has(String value) { 
    // ignoring the case by normalizing to uppercase
    return ALIAS_MAP.containsKey(value.toUpper()); 
  } 

  static public Language fromString(String value) { 
    if (value == null) throw new NullPointerException("alias null"); 
    Language l = ALIAS_MAP.get(value); 
    if (l == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("Not an alias: "+value); 
    return l; 
  } 

  private List<String> aliases; 
  private Language(String... aliases) { 
    this.aliases = Arrays.asList(aliases); 
  } 
} 

Here the initializer is used to maintain an index (ALIAS_MAP), to map a bunch of aliases back to the original enum type. It is intended as an extension to the built-in valueOf method provided by the Enum itself.

As you can see, the static initializer accesses even the private field aliases. What is even more surprising is that the static block already has access to the Enum value instances (e.g. ENGLISH). This is because the order of initialization and execution in the case of Enum types:

  1. The Enum constants which are implicit static fields. This requires the Enum constructor and instance blocks, and instance initialization to occur first as well.
  2. static block and initialization of static fields in the order of occurrence.

For more info on this see the book "Effective Java".

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1  
Having access to aliases does not mean the static block can access non static members. aliases is accessed through the Language values returned by the /static/ values() method. As you mention, the fact that the enum variables are already available at that point is the unusual bit - non static members of regular classes would not be accessible in this situation. – Ignazio Jan 8 at 10:56
    
The static block is still accessing only static fields (in the case of your enum ENGLISH,GERMAN, ...) which in this case are objects. Since the static fields are objects themselves, you can access the static object's instance field. – Swami PR Apr 29 at 8:02
    
@SwamiPR The beauty of the this is that through these enum constants (you call them static fields) I can access the instance variables already from within the static block. It is not something that can be done with a regular class: try creating an instance of the class in a static block and access it's fields, it won't even compile. Something really special is going on with enum's. – YoYo Apr 29 at 14:59
1  
class Foo { static final Foo Inst1; static final Foo Inst2; static{ Inst1 = new Foo("Inst1"); Inst2 = new Foo("Inst2"); } static { System.out.println("Inst1: " + Inst1.member); System.out.println("Inst2: " + Inst2.member); } private final String member; private Foo(String member){ this.member = member; } } The above code is no different from the enum example and still allows access of instance variable inside the static block – Swami PR Apr 29 at 18:43
    
@SwamiPR indeed it compiles, to my surprise, and I have to agree that the code is in principle no different. I have to reread the Java spec, I feel that there is something I missed. Good response back, thanks. – YoYo Apr 29 at 22:56

If your static variables need to be set at runtime then a static {...} block is very helpful.

For example, if you need to set the static member to a value which is stored in a config file or database.

Also useful when you want to add values to a static Map member as you can't add these values in the initial member declaration.

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So you have a static field (it's also called "class variable" because it belongs to the class rather than to an instance of the class; in other words it's associated with the class rather than with any object) and you want to initialize it. So if you do NOT want to create an instance of this class and you want to manipulate this static field, you can do it in three ways:

1- Just initialize it when you declare the variable:

static int x = 3;

2- Have a static initializing block:

static int x;

static {
 x=3;
}

3- Have a class method (static method) that accesses the class variable and initializes it: this is the alternative to the above static block; you can write a private static method:

public static int x=initializeX();

private static int initializeX(){
 return 3;
}

Now why would you use static initializing block instead of static methods?

It's really up to what you need in your program. But you have to know that static initializing block is called once and the only advantage of the class method is that they can be reused later if you need to reinitialize the class variable.

let's say you have a complex array in your program. You initialize it (using for loop for example) and then the values in this array will change throughout the program but then at some point you want to reinitialize it (go back to the initial value). In this case you can call the private static method. In case you do not need in your program to reinitialize the values, you can just use the static block and no need for a static method since you're not gonna use it later in the program.

Note: the static blocks are called in the order they appear in the code.

Example 1:

class A{
 public static int a =f();

// this is a static method
 private static int f(){
  return 3;
 }

// this is a static block
 static {
  a=5;
 }

 public static void main(String args[]) {
// As I mentioned, you do not need to create an instance of the class to use the class variable
  System.out.print(A.a); // this will print 5
 }

}

Example 2:

class A{
 static {
  a=5;
 }
 public static int a =f();

 private static int f(){
  return 3;
 }

 public static void main(String args[]) {
  System.out.print(A.a); // this will print 3
 }

}
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static block is used for any technology to initialize static data member in dynamic way,or we can say for the dynamic initialization of static data member static block is being used..Because for non static data member initialization we have constructor but we do not have any place where we can dynamically initialize static data member

Eg:-class Solution{
         // static int x=10;
           static int x;
       static{
        try{
          x=System.out.println();
          }
         catch(Exception e){}
        }
       }

     class Solution1{
      public static void main(String a[]){
      System.out.println(Solution.x);
        }
        }

Now my static int x will initialize dynamically ..Bcoz when compiler will go to Solution.x it will load Solution Class and static block load at class loading time..So we can able to dynamically initialize that static data member..

}

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protected by Lundin Mar 13 '15 at 7:52

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