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Suppose I have the following:

class MyWrapper
  def self.wraps_methods(mtd)
     mtd = Array.wrap(mtd)
     mtd.each do |m|
      new_name = m.to_sym
      old_name = "old_#{m}".to_sym
      alias_method old_name, new_name
      class_eval do
        define_method(new_name) do
          begin
            send(old_name)
          rescue StandardError => e
            # do something with error
          end
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

and a class that inherits from that:

   class MyChildClass < MyWrapper
     wraps_methods :first, :second

     def first
       # does something
     end

     def second
       # does something else
     end
   end

The thing is, if I put wraps_methods after the declaration of first and second, like this:

   class MyChildClass < MyWrapper    
     def first
       # does something
     end

     def second
       # does something else
     end

     wraps_methods :first, :second

   end

Then, it works. If I keep wraps_methods at the beginning, I get undefined method. I understand that it happens because the interpreter did not yet evaluate the code for first and second, but is there a way to do some kind of delayed/lazy evaluation, so that I can keep wraps_methods before the declaration of first and second methods?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since 2.0 you can prepend a Module, effectively making it a proxy for the prepending class.

In the example below, a method of an extended module module is called, passing the names of the methods you want to be wrapped. For each of the method names, a new Module is created and prepended. This is for code simplicity. You can also append multiple methods to a single proxy.

Of course, you can use a method of the parent class to do the same trick.

An important difference to the solutions using alias_method and instance_method which is later bound on self is that you can define the methods to be wrapped before the methods themselves are defined.

module Prepender

  def wrap_me(*method_names)
    method_names.each do |m|
      proxy = Module.new do
        define_method(m) do |*args|
          puts "the method '#{m}' is about to be called"
          super *args
        end
      end
      self.prepend proxy
    end
  end
end

Use:

class Dogbert
  extend Prepender

  wrap_me :bark, :deny

  def bark
    puts 'Bah!'
  end

  def deny
    puts 'You have no proof!'
  end
end

Dogbert.new.deny

# => the method 'deny' is about to be called
# => You have no proof!

As a lazy evaluation, you can harness the power of Module#method_added.

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What about Ruby 1.9? –  Tempus Jun 13 at 11:18
    
I am afraid with 1.9 you will have to record the names of the wrapped method and then use the method_added callback with alias_method or instance_method/bind(self) –  kostja Jun 13 at 11:20
    
is wrap_me_once a typo (which should just be wrap_me as in the prepender module), or am I misunderstanding something? –  Mike H-R Jun 13 at 11:22
    
oh, it's a typo. Thanks for noticing. fixed –  kostja Jun 13 at 11:24

I got it working with:

class MyWrapper
  def self.wraps_methods(*mtd)
    @wrapped_methods = mtd
    mtd.each do |m|
      wrap_method(m) if instance_methods.include?(m)
    end
  end

  def self.wrap_method(m)
    new_name = m.to_sym
    old_name = "old_#{m}".to_sym
    alias_method old_name, new_name
    class_eval do
      Thread.exclusive do
        @skip_method_added = true
        define_method(new_name) do
          begin
            send(old_name)
          rescue StandardError => e
            puts e
          end
        end
        @skip_method_added = false
      end
    end
  end

  def self.method_added(m)
    return if @skip_method_added
    wrap_method(m) if @wrapped_methods.include?(m)
  end

  def self.inherited(klass)
    klass.instance_variable_set('@wrapped_methods', [])
  end
end

class A < MyWrapper
  wraps_methods :foo
  def foo
    raise 'hello'
  end
end

A.new.foo      #=> hello
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