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I have a function which will iterate all the files and directories in the specified directory.
I have used boost filesystem for doing this.
Here is the code for it :-

void Utility::index(string IPath)
{
  path p(IPath) ; 
  string extension ; 
  directory_iterator end ; 
  for(directory_iterator it(p); it<end; ++it)
    {
      lastPath = it->path().string() ;
      cout<<lastPath<<endl ; 
      if(is_symlink(it->path()))
      {
        //cout<<"Found a symlink : "<<it->path()<<endl  ; 
      }
      else if (is_regular_file(it->path()))
      {
         extension = lastPath.substr(lastPath.find_last_of(".")+1) ;
         master<<lastPath<<endl ; 
       }
      else if(is_directory(it->path()))
      { 
        try
        {
          index((it->path()).string()) ;
        }
        catch(boost::filesystem3::filesystem_error e) 
        {
          cout<<e.what()<<endl ; 
        }
      }
    }
}

When I run this function on the directory "/", it is giving me segmentation(fault).
Looking at the backtrace in gdb I am unable to understand where the problem is.

The backtrace is :- Backtrace

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1  
Use GDB commands to move to the last stack frame in your code. Examine the arguments that will be passed to the boost function. Figure out what's wrong with them. (i.e. do some more research) –  Dale Wilson Jun 13 '14 at 13:41

1 Answer 1

Dereferencing or incrementing a valid directory_iterator can throw.

All code with it-> or ++it needs to be in a try block to handle error conditions. Consider expanding your existing try block to encompass that code.

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How does that cause a seg fault? –  Dale Wilson Jun 13 '14 at 18:24

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