Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a record TQuaternion and a record TVector. Quaternions have some methods with TVector parameters. On the other hand, TVector supports some operations that have TQuaternion parameters.

Knowing that Delphi (Win32) does not allow for forward record declarations, how do I solve this elegantly?

Using classes is not really an option here, because I really want to use operator overloading for this rare case where it actually makes good sense.

For now I simply moved these particular methods out of the records and into separate functions, the good old-fashioned way. Better suggestions are most welcome.

share|improve this question
    
Operator overloading never makes sense, imho. ymmv. In this case you have a specific problem that is easily solved by using classes - you lose operator overloading but gain what you need and the only "loss" is the ability to obfuscate a method call with an apparent (but not actual) operator - those obfuscated calls simply have to be made more apparent (read: obvious, understandable, clearer) in the code. Alternatively use pointers to records ... then you also have to manage memory for records pointed to by those pointers, and then you really are simply better off using classes. –  Deltics Mar 10 '10 at 23:33
1  
Yeah, I know I was asking for some heat when mentioning operator overloading. The point is: the problem I describe here is not the only problem my code has to deal with. Operator overloading solves a much bigger issue in the code: keeping massive amounts of mathematical operations easier to read by making them look more like their natural (on-paper) notation. That's the exact opposite of obfuscating. But again, I am very much a aware this is typically subject to heated debate amongst developers. –  Paul-Jan Mar 11 '10 at 5:23
1  
As a sidenote: I'm actually on your side of the fence, (we usually do everything with objects+interface), this is a bit of an experiment to improve the maintability of some math-intensive parts. The experience is a bit different from optimizing "ordinary" (whatever that means) code for readability. –  Paul-Jan Mar 11 '10 at 5:30
    
You might find justification for using global routines here: gotw.ca/publications/mill08.htm or here: drdobbs.com/cpp/184401197 –  Uli Gerhardt Mar 11 '10 at 7:01
1  
It is now Q4 2013, are forward record declarations for records still not supported? Being rather new to Delphi this is IMHO a rather grave deficiency. I have the exact same case. –  santiagoIT Oct 10 '13 at 11:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the operators are not the actual problem you can solve this using a record helper.

type
  TVector = record
  end;

  TQuaternion = record
    procedure UseVector(var V: TVector);
  end;

  TVectorHelper = record helper for TVector
    procedure UseQuaternion(var Q: TQuaternion);
  end;

This will solve only the circular dependencies and it does not work with operators. It also has the drawback that you cannot have any other record helper for TVector, at least not both of them can be available in the same place.

share|improve this answer
1  
I wasn't aware there was a class helper equivalent for records, thanks! Although I don't think I'd actually use this technique (I prefer to reserve helpers as a last resort to solve issues with code I cannot touch), it is the most direct answer to my question, and I'm marking it as such. –  Paul-Jan Mar 11 '10 at 8:34
2  
I wouldn't use that solution either for the same reasons. But you may consider changing the global functions into (static) class functions to narrow the scope. –  Uwe Raabe Mar 11 '10 at 9:55

There is no elegant solution in general, only old hacks with untyped references like this:

type
  TVector = record
    procedure UseQuaternion(var Q);
  end;

  TQuaternion = record
    procedure UseVector(var V: TVector);
  end;

{ TVector }

procedure TVector.UseQuaternion(var Q);
var
  Quaternion: TQuaternion absolute Q;

begin
  Quaternion.UseVector(Self);
end;

{ TQuaternion }

procedure TQuaternion.UseVector(var V: TVector);
begin

end;

For the particular cases the following pattern may be useful:

type
  TVectorData = array [0..1] of Double;
  TQuaternionData = array [0..3] of Double;

  TVector = record
    Data: TVectorData;
    procedure UseQuaternion(var Q: TQuaternionData);
  end;

  TQuaternion = record
    Data: TQuaternionData;
    procedure UseVector(var V: TVector);
  end;
share|improve this answer

I think that your "good old-fashioned" solution is the better.
as an alternate solution - but leading to your solution's schema - what about a Record containing your two record and the methods as methods of the main Record:

type  
  TQuaternionVector = record  
    Vector: TVector;  
    Quaternion: TQuaternion;  
    procedure F(V: TVector; Q: TQuaternion);    
  end;
share|improve this answer
    
How are the two fields related to the two parameters in this example? Perhaps some funky results can be achieved with this approach if you combine it with implicit assignments, but otherwise I don't think it is very practical. :) –  Paul-Jan Mar 11 '10 at 6:25

For the specific case of wanting to use operator overloading (and even more specifically, binary operators), the record types being operated on can be specified in either order.

The declarations below will allow you to add vectors and quaternions (if that makes any sense :-) ) in any combination (the 3rd Add declaration for TQuaternion is the interesting one):

type
  TVector = record
    class operator Add( v1, v2 : TVector ) : TVector;
    end;

  TQuaternion = record
    class operator Add( q1, q2 : TQuaternion ) : TQuaternion;
    class operator Add( q : TQuaternion; v : TVector ) : TQuaternion;
    class operator Add( v : TVector; q : TQuaternion ) : TQuaternion;
    end;

Assuming appropriate variable declarations the following all compile:

q1 := q2 + q3;
v1 := v2 + v3;

q1 := q2+v2;
q2 := v2+q2;

Is this enough to cover what you need?

share|improve this answer
    
Insightful, but unfortunately the method at hand is not an operator (I just mentioned the class operators to motivate my choice of sticking with records). –  Paul-Jan Mar 11 '10 at 6:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.