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I was watching 'MythBusters' confirm the myth 'The Monty Hall Paradox' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monty_Hall_problem), and I decided I wanted to make an application that calculated the number of win-ratio for both methods(sticking with your door and switching the door).

My results showed that sticking with your door gives a %win-ratio of 0.332799, and switching doors gives a &win-ratio of 0.55579. Statistically this must be wrong since the math would average the win-ratio for switching doors to .666667?

This doesn't add up, did I do something wrong? My code is as follows:

public class TheMontyHallParadox {
public static void main(String[] args) {

    boolean[] stickDoors;
    boolean[] switchDoors;

    double winStick = 0;
    double winSwitch = 0;
    double numTests = 1000000;

    for(int i = 0; i < numTests; i++) {
        stickDoors = new boolean[3];
        switchDoors = new boolean[3];

        int winningStickDoor = (int) (Math.floor(Math.random()*3)); // choosing winning door
        int winningSwitchDoor = (int) (Math.floor(Math.random()*3));            
        stickDoors[winningStickDoor] = true;
        switchDoors[winningSwitchDoor] = true;

        int selectedStickDoor = (int) (Math.floor(Math.random()*3));    // choosing selected choice
        int selectedSwitchDoor = (int) (Math.floor(Math.random()*3));

        if(stickDoors[selectedStickDoor] == stickDoors[winningStickDoor]) { // if winning choice, register
            winStick++;
        }               

        if(0 != selectedSwitchDoor && 0 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 1) selectedSwitchDoor = 2;
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 2) selectedSwitchDoor = 1;
        }
        else if(1 != selectedSwitchDoor && 1 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 0) selectedSwitchDoor = 2;
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 2) selectedSwitchDoor = 0;             
        }
        else if(2 != selectedSwitchDoor && 2 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 1) selectedSwitchDoor = 0;
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 0) selectedSwitchDoor = 1;             
        }

        if(switchDoors[selectedSwitchDoor] == switchDoors[winningSwitchDoor]) { // if winning choice, register
            winSwitch++;
        }
    }       

    System.out.println("Number of tests: "+numTests+
            "\nSticking with selected door wins:  "+winStick+" %: "+(winStick/numTests)+
            "\nSwitching selected door wins: "+winSwitch+" % "+(winSwitch/numTests));
}

}

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Igor, DwB, DJClayworth, Dan S, Raedwald Jun 14 '14 at 11:42

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Igor, DwB, DJClayworth, Dan S, Raedwald
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
@Dwb You're wrong. If you disagree with the maths, ask a question on math.stackexchange.com. – Max Meijer Jun 13 '14 at 15:28
1  
@DwB en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monty_Hall_problem#Solutions the table is a good visualizer – Steve Jun 13 '14 at 15:31
2  
You intuition is wrong. You are choosing between one random door, or what's behind both of the other two. Do the same problem with 100 doors and the math becomes more intuitive. – azurefrog Jun 13 '14 at 15:35
3  
@DwB Let's say the player's initial choice was winning. Monty shows one of the remaining two doors, which must be losing. If the player switches, they switch to the other losing door, so switching loses. On the other hand, if the player's initial choice was losing, Monty shows the other losing door, so switching will switch to the one remaining door (the winning door). So, switching always results in selecting a door that is the opposite outcome of the door initially selected. Since the door initially selected has a two thirds chance of losing, switching has a two thirds chance of winning. – Boann Jun 13 '14 at 17:12
2  
@Boann is right. Note that this is only true because of the structure of the game: the host knows which doors have the goat and which door has the prize, and MUST open an unchosen door with the goat. They are not random independent decisons. The probability that chosen door has the prize is 1/3, so the probability that the unchosen, unopened door has the prize is 2/3. Now, if the game had no memory (if the choice of the host were random, or the prize could be switched after the first door was open), then the probability would be 1/2. – outis nihil Jun 13 '14 at 17:43
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your door-switching logic is flawed.
Normally when you are checking mutually exclusive values, you can get away with leaving out else statements:

    // only one if-statement will run
    if (foo == someValue) {
        // do non-foo-related stuff
    }
    if (foo == anotherValue) {
        // do non-foo-related stuff
    }

But in this case, the logic in your if statement is modifying the value you are basing your if statements on:

    // both if-statements will run
    if (foo == someValue) {
        foo = anotherValue;
    }
    if (foo == anotherValue) {
        // do stuff
    }

So in your case, if the winning door is 2 and you initially pick door 1 you switch, and then switch back:

        if(0 != selectedSwitchDoor && 0 != winningSwitchDoor) { // true
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 1) selectedSwitchDoor = 2; // true, switch door to 2
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 2) selectedSwitchDoor = 1; // now this is true, switch back to 1
        }
        else if(1 != selectedSwitchDoor && 1 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 0) selectedSwitchDoor = 2;
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 2) selectedSwitchDoor = 0;             
        }
        else if(2 != selectedSwitchDoor && 2 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 1) selectedSwitchDoor = 0;
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 0) selectedSwitchDoor = 1;             
        }

You just need some elses in your switching code like so:

        if(0 != selectedSwitchDoor && 0 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 1) {
                selectedSwitchDoor = 2;
            } else if(selectedSwitchDoor == 2) {
                selectedSwitchDoor = 1;
            }
        }
        else if(1 != selectedSwitchDoor && 1 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 0) {
                selectedSwitchDoor = 2;
            } else if(selectedSwitchDoor == 2) {
                selectedSwitchDoor = 0;             
            }
        }
        else if(2 != selectedSwitchDoor && 2 != winningSwitchDoor) {
            if(selectedSwitchDoor == 1) {
                selectedSwitchDoor = 0;
            } else if(selectedSwitchDoor == 0) {
                selectedSwitchDoor = 1;             
            }
        }

Once the switching code is modified, we see the expected win-rate:

Number of tests: 1000000.0
Sticking with selected door wins:  332995.0 %: 0.332995
Switching selected door wins: 666670.0 % 0.66667
share|improve this answer
    
Else ifs are unnecessary here. There will be no case where selectedSwitchDoor is both 1 and 2. – wbest Jun 13 '14 at 15:48
2  
selectedSwitchDoor will be 2 once the first if statement changes it from 1 to 2. step through the code in a debugger and watch the variables change – azurefrog Jun 13 '14 at 15:50
    
Oops, completely missed that. I redact my previous comment. – wbest Jun 13 '14 at 15:56

Your code is way more complex (and therefore more prone to bugs) than it needs to be to answer this question.

Here's a simpler implementation:

import java.util.Random;

public class TheMontyHallParadox {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      final int NUMBER_OF_DOORS = 3;
      int winBySticking = 0;
      int winBySwitching = 0;
      int numTests = 1000000;
      Random rng = new Random();

      for (int i = 0; i < numTests; i++) {
         int selectedDoor = rng.nextInt(NUMBER_OF_DOORS);
         int trueDoor = rng.nextInt(NUMBER_OF_DOORS);
         if (selectedDoor == trueDoor) {
            ++winBySticking;
         } else {
            ++winBySwitching;
         }
      }

      System.out.println("Number of tests: " + numTests
            + "\nSticking with selected door wins:  " + winBySticking
            + " %: " + ((double) winBySticking / numTests)
            + "\nSwitching selected door wins: " + winBySwitching
            + " % " + ((double) winBySwitching / numTests));
   }
}

Try switching NUMBER_OF_DOORS to 100 to see what @azurefrog was talking about.

share|improve this answer
1  
Although this is simpler, it requires a good understanding of the problem to understand the code (in particular, the fact that switching always wins if the initial choice was losing). The main point of writing a program like this, I think, is to provide an analysis that's independent of opinions on the resolution of the problem. Your program would cause as much dispute as the original problem. The adjustable NUMBER_OF_DOORS is a good feature though, so +1. – Boann Jun 13 '14 at 18:13
1  
@Boann I actually think it goes the other way - the logic of this version enhances the understanding that the only way to win by sticking is to have picked the right door in the first place, and the probability of doing so is 1/N for N doors. Since probabilities must sum to 1, if the probability of a win by sticking is 1/N, it must be (N-1)/N for switching. – pjs Jun 13 '14 at 18:20
    
@pjs The problem is when people like DwB (see comments on the original question) think that the choice to switch or not somehow 'resets' the probability. I think most people are trying to implement this because they don't understand that while there are two choices (switch or stick) to make at the end, that doesn't translate into an even chance of winning, because the likelyhood of the prize being behind each door is not the same, and they won't accept that the more efficient implementation is mathematically correct without seeing the same outcome from the more complex solution. – azurefrog Jun 13 '14 at 21:38
    
@azurefrog This approach actually came from my students. I had groups of them simulating 20 trials by hand - rolling dice to choose which of 3 plastic cups to put a penny under [{1,2}->1;{3,4}->2;{5,6}->3]. One group was done in about 2 minutes. When I asked them how they were done so fast, they said that for the first experiment they immediately saw that the only way to win by sticking was to have the initial guess be right. They immediately proceeded to have the "player" state his choice and rolled the dice to see if it matched or not, no need to hide the penny and expose an empty cup. – pjs Jun 13 '14 at 23:07

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