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I have the following data frame which I called ozone:

   Ozone Solar.R Wind Temp Month Day
1     41     190  7.4   67     5   1
2     36     118  8.0   72     5   2
3     12     149 12.6   74     5   3
4     18     313 11.5   62     5   4
5     NA      NA 14.3   56     5   5
6     28      NA 14.9   66     5   6
7     23     299  8.6   65     5   7
8     19      99 13.8   59     5   8
9      8      19 20.1   61     5   9

I would like to extract the highest value from ozone, Solar.R, Wind...

Also, if possible how would I sort Solar.R or any column of this data frame in descending order

I tried max(ozone, na.rm=T), which gives me the highest value in the dataset.

I have also tried max(subset(ozone,Ozone)), but "subset" must be logical."

I can set an object to hold the subset of each column, by the following commands

ozone <- subset(ozone, Ozone >0)

Then I did max(ozone,na.rm=T) but it gives the same value of 334, which is the max value of the data frame, not the column.

any help will be great, thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
max(ozone$Ozone) or max(subset(ozone,select=Ozone)). You should definitely look at some introductory R material on column indexing for data frames, which is your basic trouble. (This is a coursera question, right? github.com/ahawker/data-analysis-coursera/blob/master/HW1/hw1.R ) –  Ben Bolker Jun 13 at 19:40
    
@BenBolker Yes it is. btw how did you gray sections of your comment. –  Alfonso Vergara Jun 13 at 20:48
1  
I used backticks `` (I'm sure there's formatting help around here somewhere?) –  Ben Bolker Jun 13 at 20:48
    
Thanks! I am following you on github, btw the name of the course is now R Programming. It's part of the "Data Specialization Track" –  Alfonso Vergara Jun 13 at 20:59
1  
@BenBolker: Here's a link to SO comment formatting - always available by clicking the "help" link beside the comment box. –  jbaums Jun 14 at 2:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Similar to colMeans, colSums, etc, you could write a column maximum function, colMax, and a column sort function, colSort.

> colMax <- function(data) sapply(data, max, na.rm = TRUE)
> colSort <- function(data, ...) sapply(data, sort, ...)

I use ... in the second function in hopes of sparking your intrigue.

Get your data:

> dat <- read.table(h=T, text = "Ozone Solar.R Wind Temp Month Day
  1     41     190  7.4   67     5   1
  2     36     118  8.0   72     5   2
  3     12     149 12.6   74     5   3
  4     18     313 11.5   62     5   4
  5     NA      NA 14.3   56     5   5
  6     28      NA 14.9   66     5   6
  7     23     299  8.6   65     5   7
  8     19      99 13.8   59     5   8
  9      8      19 20.1   61     5   9")

Use colMax function on sample data:

> colMax(dat)
  Ozone Solar.R    Wind    Temp   Month     Day 
   41.0   313.0    20.1    74.0     5.0     9.0

To do the sorting on a single column,

> sort(dat$Solar.R, decreasing = TRUE)
# [1] 313 299 190 149 118  99  19

and over all columns use our colSort function,

> colSort(dat, decreasing = TRUE) ## compare with '...' above
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thanks a lot! All of you guys are great! –  Alfonso Vergara Jun 15 at 12:28

In response to finding the max value for each column, you could try using the apply() function:

> apply(ozone, MARGIN = 2, function(x) max(x, na.rm=TRUE))
  Ozone Solar.R    Wind    Temp   Month     Day 
   41.0   313.0    20.1    74.0     5.0     9.0 
share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate on what's going on here? –  Alfonso Vergara Jun 13 at 21:04
1  
Of course, please enter ?apply in your console to follow along. The function has the following arguments: apply(X, MARGIN, FUN, ...). X refers to your array or, in this case, data frame. MARGIN specifies how you want the function to be applied to your data frame. For instance, 1 indicates rows while 2 is for columns. FUN is the function you wish to apply over your selected MARGIN. The above answer creates a user-defined function that finds the max value while disregarding NA values. In brief, the answer locates the max value in each column of your data frame while ignoring NAs. –  ccapizzano Jun 14 at 16:18

To get the max of any column you want something like:

max(ozone$Ozone, na.rm = TRUE)

To get the max of all columns, you want:

apply(ozone, 2, function(x) max(x, na.rm = TRUE))

And to sort:

ozone[order(ozone$Solar.R),]

Or to sort the other direction:

ozone[rev(order(ozone$Solar.R)),]
share|improve this answer

Here's a dplyr solution:

library(dplyr)

# find max for each column
summarise_each(ozone, funs(max(., na.rm=TRUE)))

# sort by Solar.R, descending
arrange(ozone, desc(Solar.R))
share|improve this answer

Another way would be to use ?pmax

do.call('pmax', c(as.data.frame(t(ozone)),na.rm=TRUE))
#[1]  41.0 313.0  20.1  74.0   5.0   9.0
share|improve this answer
    
This is neat (+1), but its worth noting that converting to "matrix" and, then, back to "data.frame" is slow and pmax loses its speed advantage. (apply is slower on a "data.frame", too, for the same reason). E.g. DF = as.data.frame(matrix(sample(100, 1e6, T), 1e2, 1e4)) ; microbenchmark::microbenchmark(sapply(DF, max), do.call(pmax, as.data.frame(t(DF))), apply(DF, 2, max), unlist(lapply(DF, max)), as.matrix(DF), as.data.frame(t(DF)), times = 20). P.S. Sorry, for the long (and partly irrelevant) comment here, but I do like pmax :) –  alexis_laz Jun 14 at 9:46

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