Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A::operator int() is called in the code below according to the comments in the program. I think I have a good feeling what's happening here. But I'd like to know more precisely how does the Standard support those calls? I know that this kind of (implicit) operator is invoked in copy-initializations, which doesn't seem to be the case here.

#include <iostream>

class A {
    int i;
public:
    A(int j) : i(j){ std::cout << "constructor\n";  }
    A& operator=(int j) { std::cout << "operator =\n"; i = j; return *this; }
    A& operator+=(const A& rhs) { i += rhs.i; return *this; }
    const A operator+(const A& rhs) const { return A(*this) += rhs; }
    A& operator-=(const A& rhs) { i -= rhs.i; return *this; }
    const A operator-(const A& rhs) const { return A(*this) -= rhs; }
    operator int() const { std::cout << "operator int()\n"; return i; }
};

int main()
{
    A a(1);                 //  Invokes constructor A(int), printing "constructor"
    A b(2);                 //  Idem
    A c = a + b;            //  Invokes a.operator+(b) followed by a call to the default copy constructor which copies
                            //  the object referenced by the return of a + b into c.
    std::cout << c << '\n'; //  operator int() is called to convert the object c into an int, printing "operator int()"
                            //  followed by the number 3.
    c = a - b;              //  Invokes a.operator-(b) followed by a call to the default assignment operator which
                            //  copies the object referenced by the return of a - b into c.

    std::cout << c << '\n'; //  operator int() is called to convert the object c into an int, printing "operator int()"
                            //  followed by the number -1.

    c = (a - b) * c;        //  Invokes a.operator-(b) followed by two calls to operator int(), one to convert the
                            //  result of a - b into an int and another to convert c into an int. Finally the special
                            //  assignment operator, operator=(int) is called to assign the int resultant from the
                            //  expression (a - b) * c to the object c, printing "operator =".
}
share|improve this question
2  
For each "function call", the compiler makes a list of functions that are viable with one "user conversion" (that includes constructors and conversion operators), and if there's one match it calls that. Otherwise it has a compiler error. What's the question here? What did you expect would happen? –  TBohne Jun 13 '14 at 23:25
1  
Also, I see at least one incorrect statement in the comments, where c is constructed. –  TBohne Jun 13 '14 at 23:26
    
Ah, the (a-b)*c line does hit upon a more complex case, that some function calls are "better" than others, I had missed that. So you're asking how the compiler decides which functions are the "best" match for a parameter set? That answer is actually surprisingly complicated :P –  TBohne Jun 13 '14 at 23:27
5  
It would take too long to enumerate all the paragraphs in the standard required to interpret the expressions you've given. §13.3 in C++11 deals with overload resolution, so start there. –  Brian Jun 13 '14 at 23:31
2  
" I know that this kind of (implicit) operator is invoked in copy-initializations, which doesn't seem to be the case here." Argument passing (by value) invokes copy-initialization. [dcl.init]/14 –  dyp Jun 13 '14 at 23:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.