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After some research on the same topic, I used the method "getVersion()" to check whether a JVM is 64 bit or 32 bit.

 public static String getVersion()
 {
   String version = System.getProperty("sun.arch.data.model");
   if (version != null && version.contains("64")){
       return "64";
   }else{
       return "32";
   }
 }

It went wrong in some cases. Yes as the flag name mentions, the method is clearly sun-dependent. I tried getting the property "os.arch" also. But in some cases, it is wrongly identifying JVM. Is there any more trustable way of checking the same? My application is purely based on windows. And I don't want the method to work on any other platforms.

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@Nidhin Do you mind using JNI and an extra DLL file? –  Mohammad Banisaeid Jun 14 at 6:33
1  
"And I don't want the method to work on any other platforms." This is somewhat contradictory to one of the main philosophies of Java -- write once, run anywhere. Best you can do probably is a native call. –  user3580294 Jun 14 at 6:41
    
@Joe No bro. I don't think so. Please go through my question again. I saw that link. And even that answer is not completely solving my problem. I think the question is very clear. –  Nidhin Joseph Jun 14 at 18:01
1  
You say "It went wrong in some cases." Any more detail? The linked question is an Oracle-recommended method for exactly this. –  Joe Jun 15 at 10:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a pure Java solution that checks the ability to link 32-bit library into the current process:

static boolean is64bitProcess() {
    String wow64_kernel = System.getenv("systemroot") + "\\SysWOW64\\kernel32.dll";
    if (new File(wow64_kernel).exists()) {
        try {
            System.load(wow64_kernel);
        } catch (UnsatisfiedLinkError e) {
            return true; // can not link 32-bit library into 64-bit process
        }
    }
    return false;
}
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Thank you so much. This works perfectly for me. –  Nidhin Joseph Jun 15 at 12:25

You will need the 2 jar files from here : https://java.net/projects/jna/downloads/directory/3.3.0

(Code edited to fix evaluation of IsWow64Process)

import com.sun.jna.platform.win32.Kernel32;
import com.sun.jna.platform.win32.WinNT;
import com.sun.jna.ptr.IntByReference;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(is64BitJava());
    }

    private static boolean is64BitJava(){
        if (!is64BitWindows()){
            return false;
        }

        Kernel32 kernel32 = Kernel32.INSTANCE;
        WinNT.HANDLE handle = kernel32.GetCurrentProcess();
        if (!kernel32.IsWow64Process(handle, ref)){
            return false;
        }

        return ref.getValue() == 0;

    }

    private static boolean is64BitWindows(){
        String envVar = System.getenv("ProgramW6432");
        if (envVar == null){
            envVar = "";
        }

        return envVar.length() > 0;
    }

}

In order to check if Windows is 64 bit, I check if ProgramW6432 environment variable is defined.

Then I use Win32 API GetCurrentProcess and IsWow64Process functions to examine current running process.

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I will give this a try. Thanks for your valuable answer. –  Nidhin Joseph Jun 14 at 18:10
    
This might not help. JNA library internally contains DLLs for most popular platforms and it loads one of them in run-time. Guess how JNA detects which platform it is being run on? Right, it is System.getProperty("os.arch") again (see Native.loadNativeLibraryFromJar). OP claims that os.arch may work wrong, that means that JNA library will fail to load. –  apangin Jun 15 at 10:47
    
@apangin Good point! –  Mohammad Banisaeid Jun 15 at 14:27

check this

 System.out.println(System.getProperty("os.arch"));
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"I tried getting the property "os.arch" also. But in some cases, it is wrongly identifying JVM." Right in the question –  user3580294 Jun 14 at 6:39

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