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I have a Swift class that has a constant ivar (are they called instance constants now?). To set the value to this constant, I need to call an initializer of the desired object and pass itself. However, I am not allowed to as I need to initialize all values first, then call super.init() and after that I am allowed to access self. So what to do in this case?

class Broadcaster: NSObject, CBPeripheralManagerDelegate {

    let broadcastID: NSUUID
    let bluetoothManager: CBPeripheralManager

    init(broadcastID: NSUUID) {
        self.broadcastID = broadcastID

        let options: Dictionary<NSString, AnyObject> = [ CBPeripheralManagerOptionShowPowerAlertKey: true ]
        self.bluetoothManager = CBPeripheralManager(delegate: self, queue: nil, options: options) // error: 'self' used before super.init call

        super.init()
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You could use implicitly unwrapped optional here (for bluetoothManager) and assign the value to it after super.init():

class Broadcaster: NSObject, CBPeripheralManagerDelegate {

    let broadcastID: NSUUID
    let bluetoothManager: CBPeripheralManager!

    init(broadcastID: NSUUID) {
        self.broadcastID = broadcastID
        super.init()
        let options: Dictionary<NSString, AnyObject> = [ CBPeripheralManagerOptionShowPowerAlertKey: true ]
        self.bluetoothManager = CBPeripheralManager(delegate: self, queue: nil, options: options)
    }
}

Because bluetoothManager is an optional, by the time super.init() is called, all properties are initialized (bluetoothManager is implicitly initialized with nil). But because we know that bluetoothManager will definitely have the value after the class is initialized, we declare it as explicitly unwrapped to avoid checks when using it.

UPDATE

A property can be declared as constant and still be changed in the initializer. One just has to make sure it has a definite value by the time initialization finishes. This is documented in chapter “Modifying Constant Properties During Initialization” of Swift book.

The situation when a property needs to be initialized with a call where self must be passed from not yet fully initialized object is described in chapter “Unowned References and Implicitly Unwrapped Optional Properties.”

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But then it needs to be a var, instead of a let, doesn't it? –  madboy Jun 16 at 12:28
    
No, because this all is happening in the initializer, it can still be let. But after the class initialization it won’t be possible to change it. –  eofster Jun 16 at 14:02
1  
See sections called “Modifying Constant Properties During Initialization” and “Unowned References and Implicitly Unwrapped Optional Properties” in Swift book. –  eofster Jun 16 at 14:10
    
thanks! In this case, this is exactly what I want! –  madboy Jun 17 at 9:45

How about setting up your bluetoothManager as a @lazy property and accessing it later on e.g. to startAdvertising?

@lazy var bluetoothManager: CBPeripheralManager = CBPeripheralManager(delegate: self, queue: nil)

init() { ... }

func start() {

    self.bluetoothManager.startAdvertising([ "foo" : "bar" ])

}
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That's something I already tried. And it works. But that gives away the benefit of having a let. :/ –  madboy Jun 16 at 12:27

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