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I'm creating a program that puts the first letter of a word to the back of the word so "Word" would become "ordW" and I have done that fine but when I decided to put the function into a class it doesn't work, I get access violation writing location I have no idea what is wrong with it at all, I'll show the class code and the original code:

Class code:

void Checking::test(char* first,char* buffer){
back = first;
if (first != buffer + strlen(buffer) - 1){
    ++back;
    temp = *first;
    *first = *back;
    *back = temp;

    ++first;
    test(first, buffer);
}
}

Note: The variable "back" and "temp" are declared in the class header like so:

Char* back = NULL;
Char temp = NULL;

The original code:

void test(char* first, char* buffer){
char* back = first;
if (first != buffer + strlen(buffer) - 1){
    ++back;
    char temp = *first;
    *first = *back;
    *back = temp;

    ++first;
    test(first, buffer);
}
}

I have no idea why I am getting the error when using the same function but within a class. If someone finds the error could they explain why I am getting the error and how to fix, thanks.

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I would use the debugger in this case. –  user877329 Jun 14 '14 at 14:21
    
"Char temp = NULL;". Just why would you do that? –  Baum mit Augen Jun 14 '14 at 14:22
    
How is test declared in the class? –  laune Jun 14 '14 at 14:24
    
void test(char* first,char* buffer); like so @laune –  user2387537 Jun 14 '14 at 14:27
3  
You're basically reinventing part of std::rotate. Use std::rotate. –  chris Jun 14 '14 at 14:28

1 Answer 1

I think that there is a typo

Char* back = NULL;
Char temp = NULL;

There should be at least as

char* back = NULL;
char temp = NULL;

that is keyword char is written with lower-case letter c.

As for your function that it is valid. You should check values of buffer and first before calling the function. For example if first points to the terminating zero then this condition

if (first != buffer + strlen(buffer) - 1){

will be equal to true and the result will be the same as you got.

Also I do not see any sense to define back and temp outside the function.

Take into account that you could use standard algorithm std::rotate

I would write the member function the following way

void test( char* buffer ) const
{
   if ( *buffer && *++buffer )
   {
      char c = *buffer;
      *buffer = *( buffer - 1 );
      *( buffer - 1 ) = c;

      test( buffer );
   }
}

It is more effective and simpler because it has only one parameter and does not call std::strlen each time.

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