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I have a complex search function that allows the user to select from a list of fields, then choose a search value and also a modifier. For example if this was a shopping cart, the user is searching products and can search products matching:

Name contains "ball" Price less than "5.00" Shipping out of "United States"

etc..

My problem is, I have 25 different fields to search on, some are complex relating to child and grandchild objects. So for each field I have an if structure like:

if (mod == "!=")
{
    allInvestigators = allInvestigators.Where(i => !i.Indicators.Any(j => j.Title.ToLower().Contains(txtVal)));
}
else if (mod == "==")
{
    allInvestigators = allInvestigators.Where(i => i.Indicators.Any(j => j.Title.ToLower() == txtVal));
}
else
{
    allInvestigators = allInvestigators.Where(i => i.Indicators.Any(j => j.Title.ToLower().Contains(txtVal)));
}

So to make it clear, the user can pick a field, a search modifier (==, <, >, !=) and can use several of these filters in one search! Does anyone have any ideas on how to shrink this code?

UPDATE THis is where I am now..

allInvestigators = allInvestigators.Where(i => 
                                (i.Address.State.ToLower().Contains(txtVal) && mod == "=") ||
                                (i.Address.State.ToLower() == txtVal && mod == "==") ||
                                (i.Address.State.ToLower() != txtVal && mod == "!=")
                            );
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1  
I think you are looking for expression trees. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb882637.aspx –  Lee O. Jun 14 '14 at 22:14
    
I would change the order and check mod first but I am not sure that generated SQL code would be efficient => (mod == "=" && i.Address.State.ToLower().Contains(txtVal)) –  Ilya Palkin Jun 15 '14 at 18:11

3 Answers 3

You could try putting the field queries into list of variables and ten being able to cycle through them and applying them properly. Not full code, just for inspiration:

Expression<Func<Item, Boolean>> expr = j => j.Title.ToLower().Contains(txtVal);
allInvestigators = allInvestigators.Where(i => !i.Indicators.AsQueryable().Any(expr));
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1  
so for each filter, I would build an expression object based on the search modifier and then apply it? –  box86rowh Jun 14 '14 at 22:54
    
@box86rowh The point is that if you are able to compose the queries from smaller part, you could be able to save those parts in some kind of structure/list/dictionary and then use this structure alongside the input on composing the whole query. But that is hard to say without knowing whole extend of what your query should be cappable of. –  Euphoric Jun 15 '14 at 6:01

Take a look at PredicateBuilder that is described in "C# 4.0/5.0 in a Nutshell"

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public static class PredicateBuilder
{
  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> True<T> ()  { return f => true;  }
  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> False<T> () { return f => false; }

  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Or<T> (this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1,
                                                      Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
  {
    var invokedExpr = Expression.Invoke (expr2, expr1.Parameters.Cast<Expression> ());
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>
          (Expression.OrElse (expr1.Body, invokedExpr), expr1.Parameters);
  }

  public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> And<T> (this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1,
                                                       Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
  {
    var invokedExpr = Expression.Invoke (expr2, expr1.Parameters.Cast<Expression> ());
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>
          (Expression.AndAlso (expr1.Body, invokedExpr), expr1.Parameters);
  }
}

It can be used to build Expression/Specification first.

You can find examples of AndSpecification, OrSpecification, NotSpecification in the blog post Specifications Pattern with LINQ that are similar to PredicateBuilder idea.

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You can use String.Equals

allInvestigators = allInvestigators.Where(i => 
                            (i.Address.State.ToLower().Contains(txtVal) && mod == "=") ||
                            (i.Address.State.Equals(txtVal, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) && mod == "==") ||
                            (!i.Address.State.Equals(txtVal, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) && mod == "!=")
                        );
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