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Supposed I have a class that represent some data structure called foo:

class foo{
  public:
    foo(){
      attr01 = 0;
    }
    void f(){
      attr01 += 5;
    }
  private:
    int attr01;
};

class fooSingleThreadUserClass{
    void usefoo(){
      fooAttr.f();
    }

    foo fooAttr;
}

Now supposed later in software construction, I found out that I need multithreading. Should I add the mutex in foo?

class foo{
  public:
    foo(){
      attr01 = 0;
    }
    void f(){
      attr01Mutex.lock();
      attr01 += 5;
      attr01Mutex.unlock();
    }
  private:
    int attr01;
    std::mutex attr01Mutex;
};

class fooMultiThreadUserClass{
    void usefoo(){
      std::thread t1(&fooMultiThreadUserClass::useFooWorker, this);
      std::thread t2(&fooMultiThreadUserClass::useFooWorker, this);
      std::thread t3(&fooMultiThreadUserClass::useFooWorker, this);
      std::thread t4(&fooMultiThreadUserClass::useFooWorker, this);

      t1.join();
      t2.join();
      t3.join();
      t4.join();
    }

    void useFooWorker(){
      fooAttr.f();
    }

    foo fooAttr;
}

I know that fooMultiThreadUserClass will now be able to run foo without races in high performance, but will fooSingleThreadUserClass loose performance due to mutex overhead? I would be very intrested to know. Or should I derive fooCC from foo for concurrency purposes so fooSingleThreadUserClas can keep using foo without mutex, and fooMultiThreadUserClass use fooCC with mutexes, as shown below

class fooCC : public foo{
  public:
    foo(){
      attr01 = 0;
    }
    void f(){  // I assume that foo::f() is now a virtual function.
      attr01Mutex.lock();
      foo::f();
      attr01Mutex.unlock();
    }
  private:
    std::mutex attr01Mutex;
};

Also assume that compiler optimization already took care of virtual dispatches. I would like an opinion wether I should use inhertance or simply put the mutex lock in the original class.

I've search through Stackoverflow already, but I guess my question is a little too specific.

Edit: Note, there doesn’t have to be just one argument, the question is meant to be abstract with a class of n argument.

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5  
At first you should use a std::lock_guard to lock your mutex and probably also make your mutex mutable. –  bamboon Jun 14 '14 at 23:30
3  
If it's just one int, you can use std::atomic_int. –  chris Jun 14 '14 at 23:32
    
An uncontested mutex lock is usually pretty cheap. I would add it right to the class, and only optimize if you run into performance problems (and are confident it's the mutex slowing things down). –  zmb Jun 14 '14 at 23:38
3  
Real classes don't just have one data member. Making sure that the object is always in a consistent state, with all data members synchronized, can never be implemented in the class itself. It has to be done by the client code. Passing the job to the programmer least likely to get it right. Threading is hard, let's go shopping. –  Hans Passant Jun 15 '14 at 0:09
    
@HansPassant, I disagree. Making it at the object level is the easiest way. However, all functions that manipulate data should have a std::lock_guard to make sure it stays synchronized. It happens that you need multiple objects to be synchronized and in that case, but having to implement it outside the object makes it a lot more complicated (at least in my practice of it, it has been a lot harder to synchronize a bunch of objects, unless they themselves are part of another object which can itself be synchronized in a per public function basis.) –  Alexis Wilke Jun 15 '14 at 1:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use an std::lock_guard. The lock_guard takes a mutex in its constructor. During construction, the lock_guard locks the mutex. When the lock_guard goes out of scope, its destructor automatically releases the lock.

class foo
{
private:
  std::mutex mutex;
  int attr01;

public:
  foo() {
    attr01 = 0;
  }

  void f(){
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock (mutex);
    attr01 += 5;
  }
};

You can put mutable on the mutex if you need to be able to lock or unlock the mutex from const functions. I usually leave mutable off the mutex until I specifically need it.

Will it lose performance? It depends. If you are calling the function a million times then maybe the overhead of creating the mutex will become a problem (they are not cheap). If the function takes a long time to execute and it is called frequently by many threads, then perhaps the rapid blocking will hinder performance. If you can't pinpoint a specific concern, just use std::lock_guard.

Hans Passant brings up a valid concern that is out-of-scope of your question. I think Herb Sutter (?) wrote about this in one of his website articles. Unfortunately I can't find it right now. To understand why multi-threading is so hard, and why locks on single data fields is "not enough", read a book on multi-threaded programming like C++ Concurrency in Action: Practical Multithreading

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1  
herbsutter.com/2014/01/13/… ? –  T.C. Jun 15 '14 at 0:14
    
+1 for using an RAII object to lock/unlock. –  Alexis Wilke Jun 15 '14 at 1:05
    
Cheers, I never new lock_guard existed before. This is much safer than manually doing it. –  JoeyAndres Jun 15 '14 at 1:17

Mutex per object is a good idea sometimes, but this approach is not modular. Consider this example:

using namespace std;

struct LimitCounter {
    int balance = 1000;
    mutex lock;
    bool done() const { 
        lock_guard<mutex> g(lock);
        return balance == 0; 
    }

    void dec() {
        lock_guard<mutex> g(lock);
        balance--;
    }
};

And user of this limit counter:

LimitCounter counter;  // global context

// JobRunner run some job no more than 1000 times
struct JobRunner {
    motex lock;
    void do_the_job() {
        lock_guard<mutex> g(lock);
        if (!counter.done()) {
            ...actually do the job...
        }
        counter.dec();
    }
};

This code is thread safe but incorrect (in multithreaded environment balance can become negative and job will be executed more than 1000 times). Combination of two correctly synchronized objects doesn't give us correct result.

To make it correct, you must share a lock between all instances of the JobRunner class. It must be locked just before counter.done() check and unlocked after counter.dec(). In another words - lock hierarchy must be decoupled from object hierarchy. Where to place this lock is a matter of a personal preference. You can lock on LimitCounter::lock inside JobRunner::do_the_job, or you can make JobRunner::lock a static variable, you can pass your mutex to the JobRunner::do_the_job as an argument.

Another case is when you have very large amount of objects. In this case you can't just add a mutex for each object because it is too expensive (every mutex is a kernel object, you can run out of handles). In this case you can shard your objects and lock each shard with the same mutex. For example:

mutex mutexes[0x1000]; 
....
struct UbiquitousResource {
    int unique_id;
    void do_some_job() {
        auto& m = mutexes[hash(unique_id) & 0xFFF];
        lock_guard<mutex> g(m);
        ...do the job...
    }
};

I believe that Java and C# do something like this when you use synchronized methods (in Java) or lock objects (in C#).

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