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I was curious to know how I can round a number to the nearest tenth whole number. For instance, if I had:

int a = 59 / 4;

which would be 14.75 calculated in floating point; how can I store the number as 15 in "a"?

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1  
Please clarify: The nearest tenth (14.8) or the nearest whole number (15) ? –  Carl Smotricz Mar 11 '10 at 5:21
1  
@Carl: since a is an int, it has to be rounded to the nearest whole number, doesn't it? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 11 '10 at 5:33
    
sorry nearest whole number –  Dave Mar 11 '10 at 5:34
2  
@Jonathan: Looks that way, but then why say "to the nearest tenth" in the problem statement? Either the statement is incorrect or there's something the OP wants to do that he's not clearly specifying. That's the idea behind asking for clarification. –  Carl Smotricz Mar 11 '10 at 5:45
    
@Carl: hmm, yes, good point! I am not sure why he is asking about tenths when storing the result in an integer. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 11 '10 at 5:47

14 Answers 14

up vote 11 down vote accepted
int a = 59.0f / 4.0f + 0.5f;

This only works when assigning to an int as it discards anything after the '.'

Edit: This solution will only work in the simplest of cases. A more robust solution would be:

unsigned int round_div(unsigned int dividend, unsigned int divisor)
{
    return (dividend + (divisor / 2)) / divisor;
}
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Thanks this solution worked perfectly for me! –  Dave Mar 11 '10 at 5:33
12  
Note that this is FLOATING pointer solution. I recommend that you use integer operation for many reasons. –  Yousf Mar 11 '10 at 11:32
4  
Because on systems without a FPU, this makes really, really, bad code. –  Michael Dorgan Nov 18 '11 at 23:55
3  
that's the problem. the OP's question is solvable without using any floating point at all, and so will not be dependent on FPU support being present or being good. also, faster (in the event that lots of these need to be calculated) on most architectures, including those with otherwise fantastic FPU support. also note that your solution could be problematic for larger numbers where floats cannot accurately represent the integer values given. –  Sean Middleditch Mar 21 '12 at 10:17
6  
-1, this gives the wrong answer for many values when sizeof(int) >= sizeof(float). For example, a 32-bit float uses some bits to represent the exponent, and thus it cannot exactly represent every 32-bit int. So 12584491 / 3 = 4194830.333..., which should round down to 4194830, but, on my machine which cannot represent 12584491 exactly in a float, the above formula rounds up to 4194831, which is wrong. Using double is safer. –  Adrian McCarthy Jun 9 '13 at 17:16

The standard idiom for integer rounding up is:

int a = (59 + (4 - 1)) / 4;

You add the divisor minus one to the dividend.

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4  
What if you want to perform a mathematical round (14.75 to 15, 14.25 to 14)? –  Chris Lutz Mar 11 '10 at 5:24
6  
Ugh...then you have to think...add (n - 1) / 2, more or less. For n == 4, you want x % n ∈ { 0, 1 } to round down, and x % n ∈ { 2, 3 } to round up. So, you need to add 2, which is n / 2. For n == 5, you want x % n ∈ { 0, 1, 2 } to round down, and x % n ∈ { 3, 4 } to round up, so you need to add 2 again...hence: int i = (x + (n / 2)) / n;? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 11 '10 at 5:32
1  
@JonathanLeffler: Right, but it's starting to get surprisingly non-trivial - more so again if you also want to handle the case where x + n / 2 overflows... –  caf Oct 6 '11 at 3:33
2  
This method works for positive int. But if the divisor or dividend is negative it produces an incorrect answer. The hint to @caf does not work either. –  chux Jun 9 '13 at 14:06
3  
The (original) title and the question asked for two different things. The title said rounding up (which is what you've answered), but the body says round to nearest (which is what the accepted answer attempts). –  Adrian McCarthy Jun 9 '13 at 17:29

The above answer is technically correct but will overflow prematurely. You should instead use something like this:

int a = (59 - 1)/ 4 + 1;

I assume that you are really trying to do something more general:

int divide(x, y)
{
   int a = (x -1)/y +1;

   return a;
}

x + (y-1) has the potential to overflow giving the incorrect result; whereas, x - 1 will only underflow if x = min_int...

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61.0 / 30.0 = 2.03333(3). So round up should be 2, but (61-1)/30+1=3 –  nad2000 Sep 19 '12 at 4:33
1  
@nad2000 why would 2.0333.. rounded up be 2? –  Gurgeh Nov 6 '12 at 17:20
5  
This does not work if x = 0. The intended result of x/y rounding up if x = 0 is 0. Yet this solution yields a result of 1. The other solution comes up with the correct answer. –  David Mar 16 '13 at 3:20
    
Actually, this answer is not correct at all. It works for a few numbers but fails on quite a few. See my better (I hope) answer later on in the thread. –  WayneJ Oct 11 '13 at 21:05

A code that works for any sign in dividend and divisor.

int divRoundClosest(const int n, const int d)
{
  return ((n < 0) ^ (d < 0)) ? ((n - d/2)/d) : ((n + d/2)/d);
}

The linux kernel macro DIV_ROUND_CLOSEST doesn't work for negative divisors!

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Aside from int values near min/max int, this is the best solution so far. –  chux Aug 20 '13 at 13:12

As written, you're performing integer arithmetic, which automatically just truncates any decimal results. To perform floating point arithmetic, either change the constants to be floating point values:

int a = round(59.0 / 4);

Or cast them to a float or other floating point type:

int a = round((float)59 / 4);

Either way, you need to do the final rounding with the round() function in the math.h header, so be sure to #include <math.h>.

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A typical float (IEEE) limits the useful range of this solution to abs(a/b) < 16,777,216. –  chux Aug 20 '13 at 13:07
#define CEIL(a, b) (((a) / (b)) + (((a) % (b)) > 0 ? 1 : 0))

Another useful MACROS (MUST HAVE):

#define MIN(a, b)  (((a) < (b)) ? (a) : (b))
#define MAX(a, b)  (((a) > (b)) ? (a) : (b))
#define ABS(a)     (((a) < 0) ? -(a) : (a))
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Your parentheses are making me dizzy. –  Andrew Feb 19 '13 at 0:37
5  
Sure, it looks like a bad case of LISP, but omitting the parentheses around each argument and then evaluating ABS(4 & -1) is worse. –  Justin Jul 12 '13 at 20:38
int a, b;
int c = a / b;
if(a % b) { c++; }

Checking if there is a remainder allows you to manually roundup the quotient of integer division.

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From Linux kernel (GPLv2):

/*
 * Divide positive or negative dividend by positive divisor and round
 * to closest integer. Result is undefined for negative divisors and
 * for negative dividends if the divisor variable type is unsigned.
 */
#define DIV_ROUND_CLOSEST(x, divisor)(          \
{                           \
    typeof(x) __x = x;              \
    typeof(divisor) __d = divisor;          \
    (((typeof(x))-1) > 0 ||             \
     ((typeof(divisor))-1) > 0 || (__x) > 0) ?  \
        (((__x) + ((__d) / 2)) / (__d)) :   \
        (((__x) - ((__d) / 2)) / (__d));    \
}                           \
)
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Is typeof() part of C or a compiler specific extension? –  chux Aug 20 '13 at 13:02
1  
@chux: It's a GCC extension. It's not a part of standard C. –  Cornstalks Sep 2 '13 at 20:58
    
neat way to check for signed vs. unsigned args in a macro, so unsigned args can leave out the branch and extra instructions entirely. –  Peter Cordes Dec 6 '14 at 15:49
int divide(x,y){
 int quotient = x/y;
 int remainder = x%y;
 if(remainder==0)
  return quotient;
 int tempY = divide(y,2);
 if(remainder>=tempY)
  quotient++;
 return quotient;
}

eg 59/4 Quotient = 14, tempY = 2, remainder = 3, remainder >= tempY hence quotient = 15;

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1  
PS. "thus" and "ergo" sound even loftier than "hence". –  luser droog Aug 7 '11 at 8:41
    
This does not work correctly for negative numbers - consider divide(-59, 4). –  caf Oct 5 '11 at 5:42

(Edited) Rounding integers with floating point is the easiest solution to this problem; however, depending on the problem set is may be possible. For example, in embedded systems the floating point solution may be too costly.

Doing this using integer math turns out to be kind of hard and a little unintuitive. The first posted solution worked okay for the the problem I had used it for but after characterizing the results over the range of integers it turned out to be very bad in general. Looking through several books on bit twiddling and embedded math return few results. A couple of notes. First, I only tested for positive integers, my work does not involve negative numerators or denominators. Second, and exhaustive test of 32 bit integers is computational prohibitive so I started with 8 bit integers and then mades sure that I got similar results with 16 bit integers.

I started with the 2 solutions that I had previously proposed:

#define DIVIDE_WITH_ROUND(N, D) (((N) == 0) ? 0:(((N * 10)/D) + 5)/10)

#define DIVIDE_WITH_ROUND(N, D) (N == 0) ? 0:(N - D/2)/D + 1;

My thought was that the first version would overflow with big numbers and the second underflow with small numbers. I did not take 2 things into consideration. 1.) the 2nd problem is actually recursive since to get the correct answer you have to properly round D/2. 2.) In the first case you often overflow and then underflow, the two canceling each other out. Here is an error plot of the two (incorrect) algorithms:Divide with Round1 8 bit x=numerator y=denominator

This plot shows that the first algorithm is only incorrect for small denominators (0 < d < 10). Unexpectedly it actually handles large numerators better than the 2nd version.

Here is a plot of the 2nd algorithm: 8 bit signed numbers 2nd algorithm.

As expected it fails for small numerators but also fails for more large numerators than the 1st version.

Clearly this is the better starting point for a correct version:

#define DIVIDE_WITH_ROUND(N, D) (((N) == 0) ? 0:(((N * 10)/D) + 5)/10)

If your denominators is > 10 then this will work correctly.

A special case is needed for D == 1, simply return N. A special case is needed for D== 2, = N/2 + (N & 1) // Round up if odd.

D >= 3 also has problems once N gets big enough. It turns out that larger denominators only have problems with larger numerators. For 8 bit signed number the problem points are

if (D == 3) && (N > 75))
else if ((D == 4) && (N > 100))
else if ((D == 5) && (N > 125))
else if ((D == 6) && (N > 150))
else if ((D == 7) && (N > 175))
else if ((D == 8) && (N > 200))
else if ((D == 9) && (N > 225))
else if ((D == 10) && (N > 250))

(return D/N for these)

So in general the the pointe where a particular numerator gets bad is somewhere around
N > (MAX_INT - 5) * D/10

This is not exact but close. When working with 16 bit or bigger numbers the error < 1% if you just do a C divide (truncation) for these cases.

For 16 bit signed numbers the tests would be

if ((D == 3) && (N >= 9829))
else if ((D == 4) && (N >= 13106))
else if ((D == 5) && (N >= 16382))
else if ((D == 6) && (N >= 19658))
else if ((D == 7) && (N >= 22935))
else if ((D == 8) && (N >= 26211))
else if ((D == 9) && (N >= 29487))
else if ((D == 10) && (N >= 32763))

Of course for unsigned integers MAX_INT would be replaced with MAX_UINT. I am sure there is an exact formula for determining the largest N that will work for a particular D and number of bits but I don't have any more time to work on this problem...

(I seem to be missing this graph at the moment, I will edit and add later.) This is a graph of the 8 bit version with the special cases noted above:![8 bit signed with special cases for 0 < N <= 10 3

Note that for 8 bit the error is 10% or less for all errors in the graph, 16 bit is < 0.1%.

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The first macro returns an incorrect result for 1/3. –  joshuanapoli Dec 27 '13 at 17:02

try using math ceil function that makes rounding up. Math Ceil !

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Borrowing from ericbn I prefere defines like

#define DIV_ROUND_INT(n,d) ((((n) < 0) ^ ((d) < 0)) ? (((n) - (d)/2)/(d)) : (((n) + (d)/2)/(d)))
or
#define DIV_ROUND_UINT(n,d) ((((n) + (d)/2)/(d)))
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If you're dividing positive integers you can shift it up, do the division and then check the bit to the right of the real b0. In other words, 100/8 is 12.5 but would return 12. If you do (100<<1)/8, you can check b0 and then round up after you shift the result back down.

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For some algorithms you need a consistent bias when 'nearest' is a tie.

// round-to-nearest with mid-value bias towards positive infinity
int div_nearest( int n, int d )
   {
   if (d<0) n*=-1, d*=-1;
   return (abs(n)+((d-(n<0?1:0))>>1))/d * ((n<0)?-1:+1);
   }

This works regardless of the sign of the numerator or denominator.


If you want to match the results of round(N/(double)D) (floating-point division and rounding), here are a few variations that all produce the same results:

int div_nearest( int n, int d )
   {
   int r=(n<0?-1:+1)*(abs(d)>>1); // eliminates a division
// int r=((n<0)^(d<0)?-1:+1)*(d/2); // basically the same as @ericbn
// int r=(n*d<0?-1:+1)*(d/2); // small variation from @ericbn
   return (n+r)/d;
   }

Note: The relative speed of (abs(d)>>1) vs. (d/2) is likely to be platform dependent.

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As noted by @caf in a comment to another answer, overflow is a risk with this approach to rounding (since it modifies the numerator prior to the division), so this function isn't appropriate if you are pushing the range limits of int. –  nobar Mar 9 '14 at 3:07

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