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Okay, I am working on a card playing program, and I am storing card values as hexadecimal digits. Here is the array:

 public int[] originalCards = new int[54]
        {
            0x11, 0x12, 0x13, 0x14, 0x15, 0x16, 0x17, 0x18, 0x19, 0x1A, 0x1B, 0x1C, 0x1D,
            0x21, 0x22, 0x23, 0x24, 0x25, 0x26, 0x27, 0x28, 0x29, 0x2A, 0x2B, 0x2C, 0x2D,
            0x31, 0x32, 0x33, 0x34, 0x35, 0x36, 0x37, 0x38, 0x39, 0x3A, 0x3B, 0x3C, 0x3D,
            0x41, 0x42, 0x43, 0x44, 0x45, 0x46, 0x47, 0x48, 0x49, 0x4A, 0x4B, 0x4C, 0x4D,
            0x50, 0x51
        };

The first digit refers to the suit (1 = spades; 2 = clubs; .... 5 = Jokers) The second digit is the number of the card (1 = ace, 5 = 5; 13 = K, etc).

I would like to do something like the following:

Pseudocode:

    public int ReturnCard(int num)
    {
        int card = currentDeck[num];
        int suit = card.firsthexdigit;
        int value = card.secondhexdigit;
        return 0;
    }

I don't need a new method to work on ints, I just included it for clarity's sake.

Anybody know how to do this in C#?

Edit: Okay, I am using bit shifting as described in one of the answers. I can get the second digit (the suit) just fine, but the first digit keeps coming out as '0'. Any idea why?

Edit:edit: okay, works fine now. Thanks guys.

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4  
Is there any reason you want to store your cards as ints? Otherwise I'd advise storing each card as a stuct or class. It will make you code much more readable. –  tarn Mar 11 '10 at 5:40
    
I just realized: A struct will work much better, since, otherwise, I will have to do a huge Case statement to print out a suit and value for the card. –  Biosci3c Mar 11 '10 at 6:04
    
They are many answers already on how to do what you want with byte shift. Since your question mentioned parsing, you can also turn the value into string and check the character by index (less optimal in term of performance), but an alternative :). eg. string x = currentDeck[num].ToString("X2"); which will give you a string like "11" for 0x11 or integer 17, or "4A" for 0x4A or integer 74 –  Fadrian Sudaman Mar 11 '10 at 6:32
    
You can make things even more compact by using a single byte to represent the entire deck. Put kings in first 25, then queens in next 25, etc. Now create an enum for the suits. Now to find out the suite of any card id you simply divide by 25 and cast as your suite enum. –  kervin Mar 11 '10 at 6:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's an answer using bit fields.

struct {
    unsigned int suit:4;
    unsigned int value:4;
} card    = currentDeck[num];
int suit  = card.suit;
int value = card.value;

You may need to add in int for padding as either the first or last field to line the bits up properly. Bit fields are normally used to access hardware because hardware registers frequently pack multiple flags into a single byte.

By the way if you use the bit shift, you want to shift by the number of bits in a hexadecimal digit. One hex digit holds values 0 - 15 or 0 - F, this requires 4 bits not 8. So this should be used:

int suit = (card & 0xF0) >> 4;
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The bit shifting still doesn't work for int suit. –  Biosci3c Mar 11 '10 at 6:12

Here is a working example:

using System;

namespace Test
{
    class MainClass
    {
        static int[] currentDeck = new int[54] {
                0x11, 0x12, 0x13, 0x14, 0x15, 0x16, 0x17, 0x18, 0x19, 0x1A, 0x1B, 0x1C, 0x1D,
                0x21, 0x22, 0x23, 0x24, 0x25, 0x26, 0x27, 0x28, 0x29, 0x2A, 0x2B, 0x2C, 0x2D,
                0x31, 0x32, 0x33, 0x34, 0x35, 0x36, 0x37, 0x38, 0x39, 0x3A, 0x3B, 0x3C, 0x3D,
                0x41, 0x42, 0x43, 0x44, 0x45, 0x46, 0x47, 0x48, 0x49, 0x4A, 0x4B, 0x4C, 0x4D,
                0x50, 0x51 };

        static void printParts (int num)
        {
            int card  = currentDeck[num];
            int suit  = (card & 0xF0) >> 4;
            int value = (card & 0x0F);

            Console.Out.WriteLine(
                    String.Format ("Card: {0:x4},   ", card) +
                    String.Format ("Suit: {0:x4},   ", suit) +
                    String.Format ("Value: {0:x4}", value ));
        }


        public static void Main (string[] args)
        {
            printParts(  7 );
            printParts( 18 );
            printParts( 30 );
            printParts( 48 );
        }
    }
}

This produces the following:

Card: 0018,   Suit: 0001,   Value: 0008
Card: 0026,   Suit: 0002,   Value: 0006
Card: 0035,   Suit: 0003,   Value: 0005
Card: 004a,   Suit: 0004,   Value: 000a

I'm not sure why your upper digits are not correct.

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You're not really "parsing" as such, just doing some simple bit manipulation.

int card = currentDeck[num];
int suit = (card & 0xF0) >> 4;
int value = card & 0x0F;

Will do what you want.

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Oh, so it is possible to do bit shifting. That is actually what I wanted to do in the first place, but I thought it only worked when you want to work with the bits in binary code. I will try this soon. Edit: Just curious, what is the logic behind this, particularly the 0xF0 part? –  Biosci3c Mar 11 '10 at 5:59
    
Okay, int value works fine, but suit just reads '0'. –  Biosci3c Mar 11 '10 at 6:08
    
Should be int suit = (card & 0xF0) >> 4; –  Dipstick Mar 11 '10 at 6:31
    
Sorry, I edited my answer, the >> was wrong - it should have been 4, not 8. –  Dean Harding Mar 11 '10 at 6:31

To answer your question about the use of 0xF0 and 0x0F in the bit shift example what they are doing is a bitwise and. When you do card & 0xF0 what you are doing is anding the two values, this results in setting all bits except the 4 you are interested in to 0. Ex:

 0x48   01001000     0x48   01001000
&0x0F  &00001111    &0xF0  &11110000
-----   --------     ----   --------
 0x08   00001000     0x48   01000000 >> 4
                            --------
                            00000100
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How come I keep getting zero when I try to get the upper digit? –  Biosci3c Mar 11 '10 at 6:25

You can try

int card = originalCards[1];
int suit = card /16;
int value = card % 16; 
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